Psychology (PSY)

Professor: Ryan (Chairperson)
Associate Professor: Kelley
Assistant Professors: Beery, Gilbertson, Norton, Olsen
Part-time Instructor: Mitchell

The major provides training in both theoretical and applied psychology. It is designed to meet the needs of students seeking careers in psychology or other natural or social sciences. It also meets the needs of students seeking a better understanding of human behavior as a means of furthering individual and career goals in other areas. Psychology majors and others are urged to discuss course selections in psychology with members of the department to help insure appropriate course selection.

The B. A. degree

To earn the B.A. degree, students must complete 32 semester hours in psychology including PSY 110, 331, 336 and one additional course with a laboratory (either PSY 424 or PSY 432 or PSY 433). Statistics is also required.

The B.S. degree

To complete the B.S. degree, students must complete 32 semester hours in psychology and statistics as described for the B.A. and take the following additional courses:

• One additional lab course in Psychology;
• Three of the following Natural Science courses from at least two departments: BIO 110, 111, 323, 338; CHEM 110, 111; PHYS 225, 226;
• One of the following computation courses: CPTR 125; MATH 128, 214; ECON 340, 441;
• An Individual Studies or Honors Project in Psychology or, with department permission, an Internship or the Practicum in Psychology.

Students are also recommended to take one of the following: PHIL 225 or 333.

Students interested in teacher certification should refer to the Department of Education listing.

The following course satisfies the cultural diversity requirement: PSY 341. The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the writing intensive requirement: PSY 225, 331, 336, 424, 432 and 433.

Minor

A minor in psychology consists of 20 semester hours in psychology including PSY 110, two courses numbered 200 or higher, and one course from PSY 331, 424, 432 or 433.

101
TOPICS
Exploration of a specific basic or applied topic in psychology. Different topics are explored different semesters. Potential topics include the psychology of disasters, applied behavioral psychology, and organizational psychology. The course is open to elementary and advanced undergraduates. One-half unit of credit. May be repeated once for credit with departmental permission. May not be used to satisfy distribution or major requirements.

110
INTRODUCTORY TO PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to the empirical study of human and other animal behavior. Areas considered may include: learning, personality, social, physiology, sensory, cognition and development. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

115
DEVELOPMENT FROM INFANCY TO MIDDLE CHILDHOOD
This course examines how children grow and develop physically, emotionally, socially and cognitively. Students take a detailed look at development over the infancy, early and middle childhood years of life. The implications of development at different points in life for parenting and education are reviewed.  Prerequisite:  PSY 110. 

116
ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to the patterns of deviant behavior with emphasis on cause, function and treatment. The various models for the conceptualization of abnormal behavior are critically examined. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

117
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
A general introduction to the field of developmental psychology. The course provides a broad overview of several areas of development (e.g., physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral) throughout the lifespan.  Prerequisite: PSY 110.

118
ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY
The study areas include theories of adolescence; current issues raised by the “generation of youth," research on theories and issues of growth beyond childhood, and self-exploration. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

138
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to the empirical study of the teaching-learning process. Areas considered may include educational objectives, pupil and teacher characteristics, concept learning, problem-solving and creativity, attitudes and values, motivation, retention and transfer, evaluation and measurement. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or consent of instructor.

211
LEARNING DISABILITIES
An examination of learning disabilities, emotional problems and social problems of children. Topics include the legal and educational rights of children with disabilities, the categories of disability qualifying for Special Education services, assessment of children with learning disabilities, characteristics of and interventions to help children with learning disabilities and attention difficulties, the educational placements and support services available, and Individualized Educational Programs (IEPs). Prerequisite: PSY 110.

216
ABNORMAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY
This course examines in detail the symptoms, assessment, causes, and treatments for psychological disorders primarily experienced by children and adolescents. These include separation anxiety, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, learning disabilities, autism, Asperger’s disorder and mental retardation. This course also explores the application of specific treatment approaches to children/adolescents for disorders that can be experienced by both children and adults (e.g., phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, depression, bipolar disorder). Interventions for peer/social problems, physical conditions/illness, traumatic brain injury, and the effects of poverty, divorce and abuse are also discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

220
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS
This course will review current theory and research on love. The progress of close, interpersonal relationships from initiation to termination will be discussed. In addition, the relation between love and sex is explored, and current research on sexuality reviewed. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

221
ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Environmental Psychology explores the relationship between the individual and the environment. Environmental Psychology uses theory and research to explore issues concerning the relationship between the physical environment and human behavior. Environmental Psychology promotes a more socially conscious relationship between humans and our physical environment. Topics include population control, conservation, urbanization and environmental design.  Prerequisite: PSY 110 or consent of instructor.

223
FOUNDATIONS OF SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to sport and exercise psychology, from the history and development of the field to the theories and principles that are central to the study of sport and exercise psychology. Topics include the evolution of the field of sport psychology, theories surrounding sport participants and sport environments, the group processes that are an essential part of sport, the basic principles of performance enhancement within the field, issues related to enhancing health and well-being in sport and exercise, and issues related to the facilitation of psychological growth and development in sport and exercise. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

225
INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
The application of the principles and methods of psychology to selected industrial and organizational situations. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or consent of instructor.

237
COGNITION
An in-depth examination of the field of human cognition. Topics include perception, attention, short and long term memory, reading comprehension, problem solving and decision making. Emphasis is placed on understanding the scientific nature of the discipline. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

239
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
A detailed examination of the applied analysis of behavior. Focus is on the application of experimental method to the individual clinical case. The course covers targeting behavior, base-rating, intervention strategies, and outcome evaluation. Learning-based modification techniques such as contingency management, counter-conditioning, extinction, discrimination training, aversive conditioning and negative practice are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or consent of instructor.

242
DRUGS, BEHAVIOR, AND SOCIETY
This course examines the effects of drugs on brain, behavior and society. The major focus of the course is legal and illegal psychoactive drugs, including their origins, history of use, and effects on the mind and body. Psychiatric medications and over-the-counter drugs are also addressed. Distinctions are made between drug use, abuse and addiction. Various approaches to prevention and treatment of abuse are discussed. Students are encouraged to think critically about drug use and its impact on society. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or consent of instructor.

310
FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
An examination of psychological theories and research on topics related to psychology and law. Areas covered include forensic pathology, psychological theories of criminal behavior, eyewitness testimony, jury decision making, expert witnesses, the insanity defense and criminal profiling analysis. Prerequisites: PSY 110 and 116.

331
RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY
A study of the scientific method and the application of statistics to psychology. This course compares qualitative methods such as case studies, ethnographies, and naturalistic observations with quantitative methods such as correlational research, surveys, experiments and quasi-experimental designs. The focus of the course is on quantitative methods though the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different research approaches will be highlighted. Emphasis is placed on understanding the place of research in the field of psychology. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.  Prerequisites: PSY 110 and statistics.

334
PRINCIPLES OF MEASUREMENT
Psychometric methods and theory, including scale transformation, norms, standardization, validation procedures and estimation of reliability. Prerequisites: PSY 110 and statistics.

336
PERSONALITY THEORY
A review of the major theories of personality development and personality functioning. In addition to covering the details of each theory, the implications and applications of each theory are considered. This course is best taken by Psychology majors in the junior year, because it integrates material from diverse areas of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

341
PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
A review of contemporary theory and research on the psychology of gender differences. Special topics include sex differences in achievement, power and communication; sex-role stereotypes; beliefs about masculinity and femininity; and gender influences on mental health. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

410
DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT
This course explores the relations between a variety of types of family dysfunctions and child development and psychopathology. Topics studied include child abuse, neglect, sexual abuse, and children from violent homes and homes with mentally ill parents. The course will focus on empirical literature about dysfunctional families and child development, biographical and political perspectives. Prerequisites: PSY 116 and 117, or consent of instructor.

424
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
The scientific exploration of interpersonal communication and behavior. Topics include attitudes and attitude change, attraction and communication, social perception and social influence, prosocial and antisocial behavior and group processes. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.  Prerequisite: PSY 110 and 331(or consent of instructor).

432
SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
The examination of psychophysical methodology and basic neurophysiological methods as they are applied to the understanding of sensory processes. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.  Prerequisites: PSY 110, and 331 (or consent of instructor).

433
BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to the biological psychologist’s method of approach to the understanding of behavior as well as the set of principles that relate the function and organization of the nervous system to the phenomena of behavior. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: PSY 110 and 331 (or consent of instructor).

448-449
PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY
An off-campus experience in a community setting offering psychological services, supplemented with classroom instruction and discussion. PSY 448 covers the basic counseling skills, while PSY 449 covers the major theoretical approaches to counseling. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

470-479
INTERNSHIP (See index)
Internships give students an opportunity to relate on-campus academic experiences to society in general and to their post-baccalaureate objectives in particular. Students have, for example, worked in prisons, public and private schools, county government and for the American Red Cross.

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index)
Independent study is an opportunity for students to pursue special interests in areas for which courses are not offered. In addition, students have an opportunity to study a topic in more depth than is possible in the regular classroom situation.

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)
Honors in psychology requires original contributions to the literature of psychology through independent study.