Lycoming College to present student films at AMC cinema

Lycoming College to present student films at AMC cinema

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Lycoming College is pleased to present the Film and Video Arts Senior Film Screening at the AMC Classic Williamsport 11, 300 W. Fourth St., on April 12 beginning promptly at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m.

Theater seating is limited. Free tickets are available on a first come, first serve basis to Lycoming students, staff, faculty and the general public. Tickets (limit two per person) may be obtained at Lycoming College in the Student Affairs office located on the third floor of the Wertz Student Center from 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Friday. Please call 570-321-4118 for directions.

Six graduating film and video arts seniors will be screening their films which include narrative and documentary genres. Students decide on the genre and content of their films under the guidance of their thesis professor. They write, film, edit and produce their films over the course of the academic year.

The communications department at Lycoming offers majors in corporate communication and film and video arts, with minors in corporate communication, film and video arts, film studies, and media writing. Students balance theory and practice as they study the way media interacts with society and are introduced to a variety of media in their courses, extracurricular activities, independent projects and internships.

The film and video arts seniors are proud to share their work with the community on the big screen at the local cinema theatre. “This is bound to be an enjoyable evening this year and we hope you will join us in supporting and celebrating their hard work,” says Leah Bedrosian Peterson, associate professor of film and video arts and director of the film and video arts program. “We are grateful for the support of our campus and local communities and are pleased to share these films with you.”

The films that will be screened include:

“English Hobbies,” a documentary film by Alexandra George
The creation of model trains and the process of making them from start to finish at English Hobbies train store is the focus of this documentary. Lee English talks about his life as the owner and what he does alongside some of his employees, including his 97 year-old mother. 

“No Limits No Boundaries,” a documentary by Kaitlin Lunger
A recovering addict, an addict’s daughter and a city police officer in Lycoming County exemplify the effects of addiction in everyday life through their diverse perspectives.

“Unclaimed,” a documentary film by Mary Radel
“Unclaimed” follows the Lycoming County coroner as he discusses his goal to create permanent housing for unclaimed remains.

“The Caregiver,” a narrative film by Andrew Vinogradsky
A husband received news that he is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. The struggles that he and his wife face as the disease progresses puts a strain on their relationship.

“Faking It,” a narrative film by Emily Webb
In a small town, Amy finds difficulty looking for a guy who can really make her happy. One evening, while talking to her mom on the phone, she ends up in an unpredictable lie, forcing her to fake her relationship.

“Ink Slinger,” a documentary by John Wright
The stigma against tattoos in the workplace and society is diminishing. Follow the stories of the artists, customers and tattoo removers in this documentary film.

  • “English Hobbies,” a documentary film by Alexandra George

    “English Hobbies,” a documentary film by Alexandra George

  • “No Limits No Boundaries,” a documentary by Kaitlin Lunger

    “No Limits No Boundaries,” a documentary by Kaitlin Lunger

  • “Unclaimed,” a documentary film by Mary Radel

    “Unclaimed,” a documentary film by Mary Radel

  • “The Caregiver,” a narrative film by Andrew Vinogradsky

    “The Caregiver,” a narrative film by Andrew Vinogradsky

  • “Faking It,” a narrative film by Emily Webb

    “Faking It,” a narrative film by Emily Webb

  • “Ink Slinger,” a documentary by John Wright

    “Ink Slinger,” a documentary by John Wright