Lycoming College faculty member co-edits “Faulkner and Hemingway”

Lycoming College faculty member co-edits “Faulkner and Hemingway”

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Lycoming College congratulates Andrew Leiter, Ph.D., professor of English at Lycoming College, for his work co-editing “Faulkner and Hemingway.” The book was published on Oct. 1, and features selected essays from a biannual Faulkner conference hosted at Southeast Missouri State University.

Leiter acts not only as an editor, but also as a featured writer. The publication showcases his essay "Rotten Logs and Mud Holes: Bildungsroman, Sex, and the Other in Faulkner and Hemingway,” which illuminates the development of American literary modernism through examples drawn from the works of William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway.

The publication is the second book in the Faulkner Conference Series that he has co-edited with Christopher Rieger, Ph.D., professor of English at Southeast Missouri State University and Director of the Center for Faulkner Studies. It features essays from a wide breadth of scholars including renowned scholars in the field, as well as international and emerging scholars. The essays chosen were also all featured at the 2016 Faulkner and Hemingway conference at Southeast Missouri State University. The book can be purchased on Amazon, as well as in the Lycoming College campus store.

Leiter’s research interests include modern American literature, African American literature, literary and popular representations of the American South, and multicultural intersections of the South and other regions. His published works include essays on William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Jean Toomer, Erskine Caldwell, Flannery O’Connor, Zora Neale Hurston, and Ernest Hemingway, as well as a book titled “In the Shadow of the Black Beast: African American Masculinity in the Harlem and Southern Renaissances,” which was published by Louisiana State University Press in 2010.

Leiter is also the editor of “Southerners on Film: Essays on Hollywood Portrayals Since the 1970s,” and he is currently engaged in two larger research projects, one of which features William Faulkner and his African American literary influences, and another which engages American presidential birthplaces.

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