Lycoming College Student Newspapers, 1856 - Present

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THE ANNIVERSARY MAGAZINE
The Anniversary Magazine consists of creative literary works: poetry, essays, and short stories. It was co-published by two of the literary societies of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, Gamma Epsilon, and Tripartite. Our only surviving copy is this June 1853 issue.

1853

THE STAR OF LITERATURE
The Star of Literature consists of creative literary works: poetry, essays, and short stories. It was published by the literary society Belles Lettres of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary.

1853-1858

THE BOUQUET AND OFFERING
Although part of our "newspaper" collection, the Bouquet and Offering consists of creative literary works: poetry, essays, and short stories. It was co-published by two literary societies of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, Gamma Epsilon, and Tripartite. Our only surviving copy is this June 1856 issue.

 1856

THE DICKINSON LIBERAL
This publication combines literary contributions with news of happenings at Williamsport Dickinson Seminary. The inaugural issue solicits student contributions, as follows: "By proper attention, interesting notes can be made of events daily happening around us which will add to the attractive qualities of our journal." The editorial staff dedicates their journal, " ... to the interests of student life and the promotion of literary culture, to the public."

1878-1895

THE DICKINSON SEMINARY JOURNAL
Published monthly by the Belles Lettres Union and Tripartite Union literary societies, the front content of these journals is literature, largely essays, commenting on topics or writings of that era. This is followed by news of students, professors, and alumnae, and accounts of programs and activities of the institution.

1890-1895

THE DICKINSON UNION
The second-longest running publication, The Dickinson Union covers this institution's days as a seminary and junior college until the creation of Lycoming College. Its editorial staff was elected from members of the two literary socities, the Belles Lettres Union and Gamma Epsilon.

1895-1947

THE BLANKET
Although this first issue of The Blanket refers to itself as a daily newspaper for Dickinson Junior college, it is the only copy that exists in the Lycoming College Archives. It is a mimeographed newsletter that reports the activities and events on campus, with jokes sprinkled liberally throughout. There is no indication that this was an official campus publication.

1941-1942

THE CAMPUS OFFICER
The Office Practice class of the Junior College was responsible for this mimeographed newsletter that relays news of scheduled events and campus activities over the course of the 1944-45 academic year. It also includes occasional literary contributions, such as poetry. The first issue explains that its intent is to give the students experience producing an office pamphlet, and asks for its readers' "indulgence in case of errors and illegible printing."

1944-45

THE TOWER
This was published as a supplement to The Dickinson Union. Its editors explained that it would continue with enough student support and Dr. Long's permission. Since the Archives has only one issue, it is unclear whether others were printed. It features announcements of upcoming events, student of the week selections, library acquisitions, and reports news from the football team.

1947

THE CARPET
Our collection has two issues of The Carpet, dated just twelve days apart. It bills itself as a humor magazine, and features tongue-in-cheek editorials and articles, including an advice column and a sports section entitled "Clean Sweep." Jokes are a sizable part of its content. This is the first student publication that includes photographs.

1949

LYCOMING COURIER
The headline: "COLLEGE RE-NAMED ... Story on page 3" is displayed above the masthead of the first issue of the Lycoming Courier, the first publication that bears the college's new name. Monthly issues contain reports of news and events around campus, feature articles, a music review column (Platter Chatter), and editorial comment in the form of staff editorials and letters to the editor.

1947-1957

THE BELL
The first issue of this weekly urges students to contact the staff "if you know the whereabout of a good story." Its aim was to inform students of news and events around campus, as well as affording them a means of expressing their views. It instructs, "These editorials are not to be sermonettes, pointing out the fallen virtues of the campus society, but rather, constructive criticism, important views, and controversial questions which are present in the minds of the students."

1957-1973

THE VACANT LOT
Believing that the current weekly student newspaper, The Bell , did not offer true freedom of expression, a more "radical" element of students founded The Vacant Lot. It was an irregularly-published, mimeographed "weekly." As its purpose indicated, it consists mostly of articles commenting on events of the time, both on and off campus.

1968-1969

THE COMMUNICATOR
This monthly newsletter was established to serve as "a common media of communication between students, faculty, and administrators." The content is mostly announcements of upcoming campus events, although some issues offer actual news reports. Editorial comment is lacking.

1970-1971

THE LYCO CHRONICLE
Since the weekly newspaper, The Bell, had fallen by the wayside, the English 44 class was concerned about the lack of communication on campus and undertook the publication of this weekly as a one-time project. Students selected topics of interest in order to practice writing news stories and feature articles. Little editorial comment is included.

1974

THE SPECTATOR
The discontinuation of The Bell in 1973 left students without a print communication medium. A student group began publishing The Spectator as a mimeographed monthly in 1975. In the first issue, they expressed their mission as follows: “… we hope to present campus news in a fresh way and to provide students and faculty with the consciousness that has been lacking.” The staff was able to “upgrade” and publish a more professional-looking bi-monthly early in 1976.  Content includes campus news and editorial comment.

1975-1980

THE LYCOMING ADVOCATE
The all-caps headline of the first issue announces: “MAGNA EST VERITAS” (Truth is mighty…), and the lead story explains that it is different from preceding publications because it is neither supported nor supervised by Lycoming College. The editors claim that their writing will be bias-free, and state that their purpose is to "stimulate your brain cells." As might be expected, their articles actually contain much editorial comment. Content includes reports of campus news and activities, and also national and international news. All issues are from the Spring semester of 1981.

1981

THE PETRI DISH
The Office of Student Activities published, “The Dish” weekly as a vehicle for communicating cultural events on campus and in the city of Williamsport. Appearing every Wednesday at dinner, it encouraged student participation in those events.

1982-1984

LYCOMING LEDGER
The Ledger
was a student-run, bi-weekly newspaper, published commercially. The first issue was funded by the Lycoming Administration. Their motto: “If it’s ‘fit to print,’ we print it.” Content includes reports of news on campus, and editorial opinion pieces.

1984-1987

THE LYCOURIER
The Lycourier’s purpose, as stated in the first issue, was to inform and entertain students. Issues in the 1990s and early 2000s include job postings, which have now been eliminated. Many articles cover students’ service projects and cultural events on campus. Editorial comment from students and staff include opinions on local, national, and international issues affecting their current lives and futures. Issues from the 2004-2005 academic year are currently unavailable, but will be added in the future.

1989-present