Music (MUS)

Associate Professor: W. Ciabattari (Chair)
Assistant Professors: Gunderson, Jackson
Applied Music Instructors: Adams, Breon, Burke, R. Ciabattari, Fisher, Gillespie, Karosas, Lakey, Muller, Orris, Rammon, Saville-Iksic, Shank, Wertz, Whyman

  • Major: Music
  • Courses required for major: 8 (exclusive of all ensemble, applied music, and instrumental and vocal methods courses). Also MUS 167, 168, and/or 169 and 1 hour applied music per semester as major (4 semester minimum). 
  • Colloquium: 4 semesters
  • Capstone requirement: MUS 447 and Piano proficiency examination
  • Minor: Music

Major Requirements

The student majoring in music is required to take a balanced program of music theory, history, applied music, and ensemble. A minimum of eight courses (exclusive of all ensemble, applied music, and instrumental and vocal methods courses) is required and must include MUS 120, 121, 220, 221, 335, and 336. Majors must complete the senior project (MUS 447), participate in an ensemble (MUS 167, 168, and/or 169), and take one hour of applied music per week for a minimum of four semesters including the entire period in which the individual is registered as a music major (see MUS 160-166, 170-171). Majors must also pass a piano proficiency exam. The Department strongly recommends that students begin applied study in piano and a major applied instrument or voice as soon as possible, preferably in the first semester of the freshman year. Anyone declaring music as a second major must do so by the beginning of the junior year. Four semesters of Music Colloquium are required of all students majoring in music.

Students interested in teacher certification should refer to the Department of Education listing.

The Music Department recommends that non-majors select courses from the following list to meet distribution requirements: MUS 116, 117, 128, 224, 234, and 238. Applied music and ensemble courses may also be used to meet distribution requirements.

Student recitals offer opportunities to gain experience in public performance. Music majors and other students qualified in performance may present formal recitals.

Capstone Requirements

All majors must successfully complete MUS 447 and a Piano proficiency examination.

Diversity and Writing Courses

The following courses satisfy the Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement: MUS 128 and 234. The following courses satisfy the Global Cultural Diversity Requirement: MUS 238, 335, and 336. The following course, when scheduled as a W course, counts toward the Writing Requirement: MUS 336.

Minor Requirements

The minor in music requires MUS 116 or 120, plus four additional 4-credit courses in music, at least two of which must be at the 200 level or above. In addition, students must complete 2 credits of applied music, 1/2 (0.5) credit of which must be in piano. Students may substitute 7 semesters of ensemble performance (band, choir, or orchestra) for one of the courses below the 200 level.

116
INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC
A basic introduction to the materials and techniques of music. Examples drawn from various periods of western and non-western styles enhance perception and appreciation through careful and informed listening.

117
SURVEY OF WESTERN MUSIC
A chronological survey of music in Western civilization from the Middle Ages to the present. Composers and musical styles are considered in the context of the broader culture of each major era.

120
MUSIC THEORY I
A course intended for students who have some music-reading ability. Examines the fundamental components and theoretical concepts of music. Students develop musicianship through application of applied skills.

121
MUSIC THEORY II
A continuation of MUS 120, intended for students who have some music-reading ability. Examines the fundamental components and theoretical concepts of music. Students continue to develop musicianship through application of applied skills. Prerequisite: MUS 120.

128
AMERICAN MUSIC
An introductory survey of all types of American music from pre-Revolutionary days to the present. Categories to be covered are folk music of different origins, the development of show music into Broadway musicals, serious concert music for large and small ensembles, jazz, and various popular musics from “Tin Pan Alley” to Rock to New Wave. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

220
MUSIC THEORY III
A continuation of the integrated theory course moving toward newer uses of music materials. Prerequisite: MUS 121.

221
MUSIC THEORY IV
A continuation of the integrated theory course moving toward newer uses of music materials. Prerequisite: MUS 220.

224
MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY I
An introduction to electronic music and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) for the major and non-major alike. The course traces the development of MIDI from its origin to present-day. Students utilize relevant equipment and software to create music and other sounds.  Particular focus is given to those technologies that are commonly used in public school music classrooms today.

225 
MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY II
Further consideration of recording techniques. Introduction of microphones, multi-track recording, mixing, special effects devices, and synchronization. Students take part in live recording of concerts and rehearsals of a variety of ensembles. Student projects include complete recording sessions and the production of electronic music compositions utilizing classical studio techniques and real-time networks. Prerequisite: MUS 224 or consent of instructor.

234
HISTORY OF JAZZ
A survey of jazz styles, composers, and performers from 1890 to the present: origins, ragtime, blues, New Orleans, Chicago, swing, bebop, cool, funky, free jazz, third stream, and contemporary. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement.

238
WORLD MUSIC
An exploration of the music of non-Western cultures as well as the influences of non-Western music on Western musical development. Primary course content includes the musical traditions from Asia, Africa, and Australia. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement.

330
COMPOSITION I
An introductory course for majors and non-majors who wish to explore their composing abilities. Guided individual projects in smaller instrumental and vocal forms, together with identification and use of techniques employed by the major composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisite: MUS 121 or consent of instructor.

335
HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC I
The development of musical styles and forms from Gregorian chant through Mozart, including composers from the medieval, Renaissance, baroque, and early classical eras. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement.

336
HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC II
The development of musical styles and forms from Beethoven to the present, including composers from the late classical, romantic, and modern eras. Prerequisite: MUS 335 or consent of instructor. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement.

337
CONDUCTING
A study of the techniques and philosophy of conducting both choral and instrumental ensembles. Topics include the physical skills and intellectual preparation necessary for clear, expressive, and informed conducting. Other areas such as the development of rehearsal techniques and improvement of aural skills are addressed on a continual basis. Prerequisite: MUS 120 and 121 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

339
ORCHESTRATION
A study of modern orchestral instruments and examination of their use by the great masters with practical problems in instrumentation. The College Music Organizations serve to make performance experience possible. Prerequisites: MUS 120 and 121 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

340
TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Methods and materials of teaching music in the elementary school with emphasis on conceptual development through singing, moving, listening, playing classroom instruments, and creating music. Course work includes peer teaching demonstrations, practical use of the recorder and autoharp, as well as observation of music classes in elementary schools in the Greater Williamsport area. Alternate years.

341
TEACHING MUSIC IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Methods and materials of teaching music in the secondary schools with emphasis on the development of concepts and skills for effective instruction in all aspects of music learning. Examines the teaching of general music and music theory, as well as the organizing and conducting of choral and instrumental ensembles. Course work includes evaluation of instructional and performance materials, practical use of the recorder and guitar in middle school settings, as well as observation of music classes in secondary schools in the Greater Williamsport area. Alternate years.

440
COMPOSITION II
For students interested in intensive work emphasizing the development of a personal style of composing. Guided individual projects in larger instrumental and vocal forms, together with analysis of selected works from the 20th and 21st century repertory. Prerequisite: MUS 330 or consent of instructor.

445
SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC
The intensive study of a selected area of music literature, designed to develop research techniques in music. The topic is announced at Spring pre-registration. Sample topics include: Beethoven, Impressionism, Vienna 1900-1914. Prerequisite: MUS 116, 117, 221, or consent of instructor.

446
RECITAL
The preparation and presentation of a full-length public recital, normally during the student’s senior year. MUS 446 may substitute for one hour of applied music (MUS 160-166). Prerequisite: Approval by the department. May be repeated for credit.

447
SENIOR PROJECT
For this capstone course, students complete a portfolio of work to represent the culmination of their creative and academic achievements in music. The portfolio may include: a revised and expanded paper from an upper-level musicology or theory course and a public lecture-presentation; an interdisciplinary study (e.g., in Psychology, Business) culminating in a paper or portfolio of work and presentation; a portfolio of musical compositions and a public performance/lecture; or a public recital, including printed program notes or lecture notes, a recording of the recital. 1 credit.

148, 248, 348, and 448
MUSIC COLLOQUIUM
A non-credit seminar in which faculty, students, and invited professionals attend concerts and discuss topics related to musical composition, performance, history, and pedagogy. Four semesters of Music Colloquium are required for all majors. Meets 7-8 times per semester. Pass/ fail. Non-credit seminar.

470-479
INTERNSHIP  

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY  

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS  

Applied Music and Ensembles

The study of performance in piano, harpsichord, voice, organ, strings, guitar, brass, woodwinds, percussion, jazz improvisation, or composition is designed to develop sound technique and a knowledge of appropriate literature within each performance area. Student recitals offer opportunities to gain experience in public performance. Credit for applied music courses (private lessons) and ensembles (choir, orchestra, and band) is earned on a fractional basis. One hour lesson per week earns one credit. One half-hour lesson per week earns 1/2 credit. Ensemble credit totals one credit if the student enrolls for one or two ensembles (for more information, see course descriptions below). When scheduling please note that an applied course or ensemble should not be substituted for an academic course, but should be taken in addition to the normal four academic courses.

Applied music courses are private lessons given for 13 weeks. Extra fees apply. See additional charges under Financial Matters.
160   Piano or Harpsichord
161   Voice
162   Guitar
163   Organ
164   Brass
165   Woodwinds
166   Percussion
170   Jazz Improvisation
171   Composition

167
ORCHESTRA
The Williamsport Symphony Orchestra allows students with significant instrumental experience to become members of this regional ensemble. Participation in the W.S.O. is contingent upon audition and the availability of openings. Students are allowed a maximum of one Ensemble credit per semester. A student who is only enrolled in orchestra should register for MUS 167B (one credit). A student may belong to two ensembles, choosing either Choir or Concert Band as the second group. Such a student then registers for MUS 167A (1/2 credit) plus either MUS 168A (1/2 credit) or MUS 169A (1/2 credit).

168
CHOIR
The Lycoming College Choir is open to all students who would like to sing in an ensemble setting. Emphasis is on performing quality choral literature while developing good vocal technique. Students are allowed a maximum of one Ensemble credit per semester. A student who is only enrolled in Choir should register for MUS 168B (one credit). A student may belong to two ensembles, choosing either Orchestra or Band as the second ensemble. Such a student then registers for MUS 168A (1/2 credit) plus either MUS 167A (Orchestra - 1/2 credit) or MUS 169A (Band - 1/2 credit). If a student has auditioned and been selected for the Chamber Choir (no credit available), he/she should register for MUS 168C in addition to registering for the Lycoming College Choir.

169
BAND
The College Concert Band allows students with some instrumental experience to become acquainted with good band literature and develop personal musicianship through participation in group instrumental activity. Participation in the Band is contingent upon audition. Students are allowed a maximum of one Ensemble credit per semester. A student who is only enrolled in Band should register for MUS 169B (one credit). A student may belong to two ensembles, choosing either Orchestra or Choir as the second group. Such a student then registers for MUS 169A (1/2 credit) plus either MUS 167A ( 1/2 credit) or MUS 168A (1/2 credit). If a student has auditioned and been selected for the woodwind or brass quintets (no credit available), he/she should register for MUS 169C or 169D.

261-267
INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL METHODS
Instrumental and vocal methods classes are designed to provide students seeking certification in music education with a basic understanding of all standard band and orchestral instruments as well as a familiarity with fundamental techniques of singing.

MUS 261              Brass Methods (one credit)
MUS 262              Percussion Methods (one credit)
MUS 263, 264      String Methods I and II (one credit each)
MUS 265              Vocal Methods (one credit)
MUS 266, 267      Woodwind Methods I and II (one credit each)