Mathematical Sciences

Associate Professors: Peluso (Chairperson), Sprechini
Assistant Professors: deSilva, Smith
Visiting Instructor: Reed
Part-time Instructors: Abercrombie, Collins, Davis

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers a major program in mathematics and minor programs in computer science, computational science and mathematics. Interested students may want to investigate the interdisciplinary actuarial mathematics major as well.

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CPTR) 

Minor

The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers two computing minors: Computer Science and Computational Science.

A minor in computer science consists of either Math 115 or 216, CPTR 125, 246, 247 and two other computer science courses numbered 220 or above.

A minor in computational science consists of either Math 115 or 216, CPTR 125, 246 and 247; one of CPTR 321, 345 or 339; and an approved computational research project in the student’s major discipline, which can be fulfilled through ASTR/PHYS 448, BIO 447, CHEM 449, Independent Study, Honors Project, Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) or other research experience. Computational science is the study of the application of computation to the sciences. The minor in computational science provides students with a core understanding of computer-based problem solving and prepares them to apply that computational power in their chosen discipline.

The following course, when scheduled as a W course, counts toward the writing intensive requirement: CPTR 247.

101
MICROCOMPUTER FILE MANAGEMENT
An introduction to a file-management system, i.e. a database system that uses a single file, in the Windows environment. One-half unit of credit. This course may not be used to meet distribution requirements.

102
INTRODUCTION TO VIRTUAL WORLDS
Using Carnegie Mellon’s Alice software, students create 3-D animations for both storytelling and gaming applications. This is a project-based course where class time is roughly split with one-third demonstration/lecture and two-thirds hands-on project development. Topics include storyboarding, object-oriented modular construction, decision and repetition control structures, and event handling. One-half unit of credit.

125
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE
Introduction to the discipline of computer science with emphasis on programming using an object-oriented high-level programming language. Topics include algorithms, program structure and problem-solving techniques. Laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100.

246
PRINCIPLES OF ADVANCED PROGRAMMING
Principles of effective programming, including structured and object oriented programming, stepwise refinement, debugging, recursion, inheritance, polymorphism, pointers and linked data structures. Laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CPTR 125.

247
DATA STRUCTURES
Representation of data and analysis of algorithms associated with data structures. Topics include representation of lists, trees, graphs, algorithms for searching and sorting. Efficiency of algorithms is emphasized.  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CPTR 246, or consent of instructor.

321
INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS
Topics from the theory of interpolation; numerical approaches to approximation of roots and functions, integration, systems of differential equations, linear systems, matrix inversion and the eigenvalue problem. Prerequisites: CPTR 125 and MATH 129; MATH 130 strongly recommended. Cross-listed as MATH 321.

322
INTRODUCTION TO WEB-BASED PROGRAMMING
Intermediate programming on the World Wide Web. Topics covered include client/server issues in Web publishing and current programming languages used in Web development. Laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: CPTR 125.

324
AUTOMATA, FORMAL LANGUAGES, AND COMPUTABILITY
The study of finite state machines, pushdown stacks and Turing machines along with their equivalent formal language counterparts. Topics covered include results on computability, including results regarding the limits of computers and specific problems that cannot be solved. Prerequisite: MATH 216 or 234. Cross-listed as MATH 324. Alternate years.

339
INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE SYSTEMS
An introduction to the relational database model and SQL. Topics include but are not limited to: relational model of data; ER diagrams; schema; SQL commands for table construction, updating, and querying; transaction processing; and database integrity. Laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: CPTR 125.

345
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS
An introduction to graphics software with emphasis on the algorithms, data structures and application programming interfaces that support the creation of two- and three-dimensional image generation and animation. Alternate years.

470
INTERNSHIP (See index)  

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index)

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)

MATHEMATICS (MATH)

A major in mathematics consists of CPTR 125, MATH 128 (or exemption by examination from 128), 129, 130, 234, 238, 432, 434 and one of the following three options: MATH 332 and one other mathematics course numbered 216 or above; or MATH 214 and one other mathematics course numbered 220 or above; or MATH 123 and two other mathematics courses numbered 220 or above.  In addition, four semesters of MATH 449 are required. All majors are advised to elect PHIL 225, 333 and PHYS 225, 226.

The following course, when scheduled as a W course, counts toward the writing intensive requirement: MATH 234.

Students interested in teacher certification should refer to the Department of Education listings.

Students who are interested in pursuing a career in actuarial science should consider the actuarial mathematics major.

Minor

A minor in mathematics consists of MATH 128 (or exemption by examination from 128), 129, and either 216 or 234; 238; one additional course selected from 130, 214 or any course numbered 200 or above; and two semesters of MATH 449. The two semesters of MATH 449 may be replaced by any course numbered 220 or above.

100
INDIVIDUALIZED LABORATORY INSTRUCTION IN BASIC ALGEBRA
A computer-based program of instruction in basic algebra including arithmetic and decimals, fractions, the real number line, factoring, solutions to linear and quadratic equations, graphs of linear and quadratic functions, expressions with rational exponents, algebraic functions, exponential functions and inequalities. This course is limited to students placed therein by the Mathematics Department. One-half unit of credit.

106
COMBINATORICS
An introduction to the analysis of counting problems. Topics include permutations, combinations, binomial coefficients, inclusion/exclusion principle and partitions. The nature of the subject allows questions to be posed in everyday language while still developing sophisticated mathematical concepts. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100.

115
APPLIED DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
Introduction to discrete structures and their applications in computer science. Topics include elementary logic, discrete number systems, elementary combinatorial theory, finite automata, formal language constructs and general algebraic structures including Boolean algebras, graphs and trees. Laboratory experience is included using current software. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100.

109
APPLIED ELEMENTARY CALCULUS
An intuitive approach to the calculus concepts with applications to business, biology and social-science problems. Not open to students who have completed MATH 128. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100.

112
FINITE MATHEMATICS FOR DECISION-MAKING
An introduction to some of the principal mathematical models, not involving calculus, which are used in business administration, social sciences and operations research. The course includes both deterministic models such as graphs, networks, linear programming and voting models, and probabilistic models such as Markov chains and games. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100.

123
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
Topics include tabular and graphical descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions, Central Limit Theorem, one- and two-sample hypotheses tests, analysis of variance, chi-squared tests, nonparametric tests, linear regression and correlation. Other topics may include index numbers, time series, sampling design and experimental design. Course also includes some use of a microcomputer. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100.

127
PRECALCULUS MATHEMATICS
The study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, their graphs and elementary properties. This course is an intensive preparation for students planning to take Calculus (MATH 128-129) or Matrix Algebra (MATH 130), or those whose major specifically requires Precalculus. This course is taught solely as a review of topics that must be mastered by students who intend to take MATH 128 or MATH 130. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from MATH 100. Not for distribution.

128-129
CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I - II
Differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions, conic sections and their applications, graphing plane curves, applications to related rate and external problems, areas of plane regions, volumes of solids of revolution, and other applications; differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, and series expansions of functions. Prerequisite for 128: Exemption from or a grade of C- or better in MATH 127. Prerequisite for 129: exemption from or a grade of C- or better in MATH 128.

130
INTRODUCTION TO MATRIX ALGEBRA
Systems of linear equations and matrix arithmetic. Points and hyperplanes, infinite dimensional geometries. Bases and linear independence. Matrix representations of linear mappings. The fixed point problem. Special classes of matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 127 or its equivalent.

214
MULTIVARIABLE STATISTICS
The study of statistical techniques involving several variables. Topics include confidence intervals and hypothesis tests about means and variances, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests with simple and multiple linear regression and correlation, assessing appropriateness of linear regression models, one-and two-way analysis of variance with post hoc tests, analysis of covariance and analysis of contingency tables. Other topics may include discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, factor analysis and canonical correlations, repeated measure designs, time series analysis and nonparametric methods. Course also includes extensive use of a statistical package (currently SPSS). Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MATH 123, or a grade of C- or better in both MATH 128 and any mathematics course numbered 129 or above; or consent of instructor.

216
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
An introduction to discrete structures. Topics include equivalence relations, partitions and quotient sets, mathematical induction, recursive functions, elementary logic, discrete number systems, elementary combinatorial theory and general algebraic structures emphasizing semi-groups, lattices, Boolean algebras, graphs and trees. Prerequisite: CPTR 125 or consent of instructor.

231
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
A study of ordinary differential equations and linear systems. Solution techniques include: reduction of order, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, Laplace transforms, power series, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. A brief discussion of numerical methods may also be included. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MATH 129; MATH 130 recommended.

233
COMPLEX VARIABLES
Complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, Cauchy’s theorems and their applications. Corequisite: MATH 238. Alternate years.

234
FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS
Topics regularly included are the nature of mathematical systems, essentials of logical reasoning and axiomatic foundations of set theory. Other topics frequently included are approaches to the concepts of infinity and continuity and the construction of the real number system. The course serves as a bridge from elementary calculus to advanced courses in algebra and analysis. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MATH 129 or 130; both courses recommended.  Corequisite: MATH 449.

238
MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS
Algebra, geometry, and calculus in multidimensional Euclidean space; n-tuples, matrices; lines, planes, curves, surfaces; vector functions of a single variable, acceleration, curvature; functions for several variables, gradient; line integrals, vector fields, multiple integrals, change of variable, areas, volumes; Green’s theorem. Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in MATH 129, and either MATH 130 or 231.

321
INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS
Topics from the theory of interpolation; numerical approaches to approximating roots and functions, integration, systems of differential equations, linear systems, matrix inversion and the eigenvalue problem. Prerequisites: CPTR 125 and MATH 129; MATH 130 strongly recommended. Cross-listed as CPTR 321.

324
AUTOMATA, FORMAL LANGUAGES, AND COMPUTABILITY
The study of finite state machines, pushdown stacks and Turing machines along with their equivalent formal language counterparts. Topics covered include results on computability, including results regarding the limits of computers and specific problems that cannot be solved. Prerequisite: MATH 216 or 234. Cross-listed as CPTR 324. Alternate years.

325
THEORY OF INTEREST WITH APPLICATIONS
The mathematical theory of interest in both finite and continuous time is explored together with some applications to economics and finance; specifically, these concepts are applied in the use of the various annuity functions and in the calculation of present and accumulated value for various streams of cash flows as a basis for future use in reserving, valuation, pricing, duration, asset/liability management, investment income, capital budgeting and contingencies. Prerequisite: C or better in Math 129.

330
TOPICS IN GEOMETRY
An axiomatic treatment of Euclidean geometry with an historical perspective. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in either MATH 129 or 130. Alternate years.

332-333
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I-II
A study of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expected values and moments, sampling, point estimation, sampling distributions, interval estimation, test of hypotheses, regression and linear hypotheses, experimental design models. Corequisite: MATH 238. Alternate years.

338
OPERATIONS RESEARCH
Queuing theory, including simulations techniques, optimization theory, including linear programming, integer programming and dynamic programming; game theory, including two-person zero-sum games, cooperative games and multiperson games. Prerequisite: MATH 112 or 130. Alternate years.

400
TOPICS IN ACTUARIAL MATHEMATICS
Study of topics selected from those covered on the examinations administered by the Society of Actuaries with the exception of the topics already covered in MATH 332-333. Prerequisite: The prerequisite(s) for this course will depend on the particular topic being taught. With consent of the instructor, this course may be repeated for credit.

432
REAL ANALYSIS
An introduction to the rigorous analysis of the concepts of real variable calculus in the setting of normed spaces. Topics from: topology of the Euclidean plane, completeness, compactness, the Heine-Borel theorem; functions on Euclidean space, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiability; series and convergence; Riemann integral. Prerequisites: MATH 238 and a grade of C- or better in MATH 234.

434
ABSTRACT ALGEBRA
An integrated approach to groups, rings, fields, and vector spaces and functions which preserve their structure. Prerequisites: MATH 130 and a grade of C- or better in MATH 234.

438
SEMINAR
Topics in modern mathematics of current interest to the instructor. A different topic is selected each semester. This semester is designed to provide junior and senior mathematics majors and other qualified students with more than the usual opportunity for concentrated and cooperative inquiry. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. One-half unit of credit. This course may be repeated for credit.

449
MATH COLLOQUIUM
This required non-credit course for mathematics majors and minors and actuarial mathematics majors offers students a chance to hear, prepare, and give presentations on topics related to, but not directly covered in formal MATH courses. Each semester students are required to either prepare or present a lecture on some appropriate topic in mathematics. Mathematics majors present two lectures, typically one during the junior year and one during the senior year. Actuarial mathematics majors and mathematics minors present one lecture. A letter grade is given based on attendance and on either presentation preparation or the presentation given. One hour per week.

470-479
INTERNSHIP (See index)

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index)

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)