History (HIST)

Associate Professors: Chandler (Chair), Silkey
Assistant Professors: Pearl, Seddelmeyer

  • Major: History
  • Courses required for major: 10
  • Non-credit Colloquium: 3 semesters
  • Capstone requirement: History 449
  • Minors: American History, European History, History

Major Requirements

A major consists of 10 courses, including HIST 115, 116, 449 and at least one from 401, 402, 404, or 405. At least seven courses must be taken in the department, three of which must be numbered 300 or above. In addition, majors are required to successfully complete at least three semesters of History Colloquium from HIST 248, 348, and 448. The following courses may be counted toward fulfilling the major requirements: AMST 200, PSCI 140 and 369, REL 226 and 328. Other appropriate courses outside the department may be counted upon departmental approval. For history majors who student teach, EDUC 465 Professional Semester of Student Teaching may count as one course for the history major. In addition to the courses listed below, special courses, independent study, and honors are available. History majors are also encouraged to participate in the internship program.

Students interested in teacher certification should refer to the Department of Education listing.

Capstone Requirement

All majors must successfully complete History 449.

Diversity and Writing Courses

The following courses satisfy the Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement: HIST 230, 338, 342, and 402. The following courses satisfy the Global Cultural Diversity Requirement: HIST 221, 232, 243, 246, 329, and 336. The following course satisfies either the Domestic or Global Diversity Requirement: HIST 242. The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the Writing Requirement: HIST 210, 338, 401, 402, 404, 405, and 449.

Minor Requirements

Three minors are offered by the Department of History. The following courses are required to complete a minor in American History: HIST 125, 126, and three courses in American history numbered 200 and above (including HIST 221). A minor in European History requires the completion of HIST 115, 116, and three courses in European history numbered 200 and above. To obtain a minor in History (without national or geographical designation), a student must complete six courses in history, of which three must be chosen from HIST 115, 116, 125, and 126, and three must be history courses numbered 200 and above.

115        
WESTERN CIVILIZATION I
A survey of the major developments in the history of Western Civilization from its roots in the Ancient Near East to the era of the Renaissance. Considers the political, social, and cultural aspects of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the ancient Hebrews, Greece, Rome, and Western Europe. Byzantine and Islamic civilizations are studied to provide a wider scope for comparison.

116
WESTERN CIVILIZATION II
A survey of the major developments in the history of Western Civilization from the era of the Renaissance to the present. Focuses on the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural aspects of European history and how Europe interacted with the rest of the world.

125
UNITED STATES TO 1877
An introduction to the history of the United States of America from before European colonization to the end of Reconstruction. Examines the people, measures, and movements of this history, endeavoring to do justice to the people, in all their diversity, who together created the ideals, institutions, and realities, which we inherit today.

126
UNITED STATES SINCE 1877
A study of people, measures, and movements which have been significant in the development of the United States since the end of Reconstruction. Examines the social and political struggles that established the rights, ideals, and institutions of modern American society and explores the diversity of experiences within this rapidly changing nation.

210
ANCIENT HISTORY
A study of the ancient western world, including the foundations of the western tradition in Greece, the emergence and expansion of the Roman state, its experience as a republic, and its transformation into the Empire. Focuses on the social and intellectual life of Greece and Rome as well as political and economic changes. Alternate years.

212
MEDIEVAL EUROPE AND ITS NEIGHBORS
The history of Europe from the dissolution of the Roman Empire to the mid-15th century. Addresses the growing estrangement of western Catholic Europe from Byzantium and Islam, culminating in the Crusades; the rise of the Islamic Empire and its later fragmentation; the development and growth of feudalism; the conflict of empire and papacy; and the rise of towns. Alternate years.

214
MONARCHY AND MODERNITY
Explores the development, function, and transformation of European monarchies from the 16th to the 20th century. Considers topics such as power and authority, revolutions, and institutional reform from political, economic, social, and cultural perspectives. Alternate years.

217
20TH CENTURY EUROPE
Examines European history from the origins of World War I through the emergence of a new Europe. Examines topics such as World War I, the interwar period, World War II, and the Cold War from political, diplomatic, economic, and social perspectives. Alternate years.

221
LATIN AMERICA
An examination of the native civilization, the age of discovery and conquest, Spanish colonial policy, the independence movements, and the development of modern institutions and governments in Latin America. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

226
COLONIAL AMERICA AND THE REVOLUTIONARY ERA
The establishment of British settlements on the American continent, their history as colonies, the causes and events of the American Revolution, the critical period following independence, adoption of the United States Constitution, and the ending of the American Revolution in 1804. Alternate years.

230
AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY
A study of the experiences and participation of African Americans in the United States. The course includes historical experiences such as slavery, abolition, reconstruction, and urbanization. It also raises the issue of the development and growth of white racism and the effect of this racism on contemporary Afro-American social, intellectual, and political life. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

232
THE RISE OF ISLAM
A survey of the history of Islam in the Middle East, illuminating the foundation of the religion and its spread in the seventh and eighth centuries, the development of a high civilization thereafter, and the subsequent changes in political and social structures over time. Muslim interactions with Christian and Jews are included, but the emphasis is an understanding of the history of Islamic civilization in its own right. Concludes with a consideration of recent crises in the Middle East and their roots in modern history.Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

233
CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
An intensive study of the political, economic, social, cultural as well as military history of the United States in the Civil War era. Topics include the rise of sectional tensions leading up to the secession crisis in 1860, the extent to which the war can be considered the first modern war, the mobilization of the home fronts to support the war effort, the impact of the war on specific groups such as women and African-Americans, and the failed effort to “reconstruct” the South. Alternate years.

242
VIETNAM WAR AT HOME AND ABROAD
An examination of the impact of the Vietnam War on American society. Rather than focusing on traditional military history, this course investigates the diversity of perspectives and individual experiences among soldiers, civilians, families, and protestors during the war. Explores topics such as the impact of combat experiences on American soldiers, the anti-war movement, and the social and political legacy of the Vietnam War. Fulfills either Domestic or Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

243
ASIA IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT
An examination of major themes and developments in Asian history with an emphasis on interaction between Asian nations and the wider world. Explores topics such as Western presence in Asia, Asian nationalisms, and economic development. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

246
AFRICA AND THE WORLD
An examination of major themes and developments in African history centered on relations between African nations and the rest of the world. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

324
EARLY AMERICAN LAW AND SOCIETY
A study of the interaction between legal and social change in Early America from the colonial period through the “Age of Jackson.” Examines both the substance of law (legal doctrine and judicial opinions) and society’s use and reaction to that law. Using primary and secondary sources, students examine the different ways in which men and women, freedmen and slaves, frontier settlers and native peoples viewed and interpreted the way law reflected or challenged basic social, political, and economic values. Prerequisite: HIST 125 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

329
EMPIRES AND RESISTANCE
An exploration of imperialism and the resistance to imperial expansion at home and abroad. Considers topics such as the expansion and dissolution of European Empires, methods of resistance, and colonial nationalism. Prerequisite: One history course or consent of instructor. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

334
ORIGINS OF EUROPE
Takes an in-depth look at the formative period of European civilization from the decline and fall of the Roman Empire to the formation, around the year 1000, of monarchies that resemble modern states. Important issues include the development and spread of early Christianity, the assumption of rule over Roman territory by barbarians, and the blending of Roman, Christian, and Germanic barbarian traditions into one European civilization. Prerequisite: HIST 115, 212, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

336
CRUSADES: CONFLICT AND ACCOMMODATION
An intensive consideration of interactions between Muslims and Christians in the Middle Ages. Hostile and fruitful relations in Spain, warfare in the Holy Land, and the status of religious minorities are studied. In addition to the often violent relations between these major religious groups, this course addresses their intellectual, artistic, and literary developments as well as reciprocal influences. Prerequisite: HIST 115, 212, or consent of instructor. Fulfills Global Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

338
RIGHTS, REFORM, AND PROTEST
An exploration of the evolution of social justice movements in American society. This seminar examines interconnections between late-nineteenth- and twentieth-century protest movements such as suffrage, civil rights, women’s liberation, disabled rights, and gay liberation. Prerequisite: One history course or consent of instructor. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

342
WOMEN AND REFORM
A study of the development and evolution of transnational women’s reform networks, exploring the particular challenges faced by women reformers and the role they played in shaping American society. The seminar examines topics such as antislavery, temperance, woman’s suffrage, anti-lynching, club and urban reform movements. Prerequisite: One history course or consent of instructor. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

345
SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY
Study of selected historical problems, themes, periods, or movements. Prerequisite: One history course or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of department when topics are different.

401
THE MIDDLE AGES IN MODERN EYES
An in-depth study of medieval history by way of modern understandings of the period. Focuses on academic interpretations, but also considers the Middle Ages in the popular imagination such as in film. Examination of the documents, literature, and art of the period constitutes the second major area of course assignments. Student work culminates in a major research project based on the study of translated primary sources. Prerequisite: HIST 115, 212, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

402
REVEL, RIOT, AND REBELLION IN EARLY AMERICA
An in-depth look at the place of popular resistance in Early America. Focuses on riots and rebellions in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries in order to get a better understanding of the politics, society, and culture of Early America. Native American and slave revolts are examined alongside the riots and rebellions of European Americans. Students develop a substantial research paper on a particular riot or rebellion drawing on academic interpretations and primary sources. Prerequisite: HIST 125 or consent of instructor. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

404
U.S. SINCE 1945
An in-depth study of historical understandings of American political, social, and intellectual developments in the years following World War II. Focuses primarily on academic interpretations, but also considers post-war America in the popular imagination, as represented by film, music, and literature. Student work culminates in a major independent research project incorporating both primary and secondary source analysis. Prerequisite: HIST 126 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

405
BRITISH EMPIRE
An in-depth study of European history through an examination of the rise and fall of the British Empire. Focuses not only on academic interpretations of empire, but also considers the legacy of empire, as represented in documents, film, and literature. Student work culminates in a major independent research project, which incorporates primary and secondary source analysis. Prerequisite: HIST 116 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

248, 348, AND 448
HISTORY COLLOQUIUM
This non-credit but required course for students majoring in history offers students opportunities to meet for a series of occasional events, including methodology workshops and presentations by faculty, guest speakers, and departmental majors. Students taking HIST 449 concurrently deliver formal presentations; those who have not yet taken HIST 449 develop research topic ideas. A letter grade is assigned in a semester when a student gives a presentation. Otherwise the grade is P/F. History majors are required to successfully complete a minimum of three semesters of colloquium. HIST 449 is a corequisite for HIST 448. Non-credit course.

449
HISTORICAL METHODS IN PRACTICE
This capstone experience focuses on the practice of historical research, analysis, and writing. It provides students with the opportunity to apply historical methodology through the completion of a substantial independent research project incorporating historiographical and primary source analysis of a proposed topic, subject to instructor approval. Required of majors in their junior or senior year. Prerequisite: HIST 248 or 348 and one course from HIST 401, 402, 404, and 405, or consent of instructor. Corequisite: HIST 448.

470-479
INTERNSHIP 
Typically, history interns work for local government agencies engaged in historical projects or for the Lycoming County Historical Museum.

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Recent topics include Viking migrations, medieval paleography, public law in colonial America, AIDS activism, gendered responses to the Moynihan Report, and the history of Lycoming County.

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY