Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean (ARCH)

Assistant Professors: Knauth (Coordinator)
Professors: Dever, Gaber

  • Major: Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean
  • Courses required for major: 10
  • Required language: 2 courses in GRK, HEBR, or LAT, at least one at the 102 level or above
  • Non-credit Colloquium: 2 semesters
  • Capstone requirement: Archaeological field school or internship, colloquium presentation, and portfolio
  • Minor: Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean

The interdisciplinary major in Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East and
Mediterranean (ARCH) is designed to acquaint students with the “cradle of Western
civilization.” The major requires completion of ten courses relevant to the study of the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds plus colloquium and a capstone experience.

Major Requirements

1. Five core courses plus Archaeology Colloquium:
ARHI 222       Survey of Art I: Ancient, Medieval, and Non-Western
HIST 210        Ancient History or REL 323 Hellenistic-Roman Cultural World
REL 226         Biblical Archaeology
REL 328         History and Culture of the Ancient Near East
ARCH 448      Archaeology Colloquium (prerequisite ARCH 348)
ARCH 449      Archaeological Theory and Method

2. One course in Anthropology (prerequisite for ARCH 449) from:
ANTH 229      Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 230      Anthropology of Latin America
ANTH 232      Environmental Anthropology
ANTH 310      Food and Culture
ANTH 334      Economic Anthropology
ANTH 344      Anthropological Theory

3. Two courses in ancient language study (at least one of which must be at the 102 level or
above) from:
GRK 101, 102, 221, 222        Biblical Greek Grammar and Readings
HEBR 101, 102, 221, 222      Biblical Hebrew Grammar and Readings
LAT 101, 102, 221, 222         Latin Grammar and Readings
(Akkadian, Arabic, Classical Greek, Coptic, or Modern Hebrew may be substituted.)

Although not included in the major, the study of French and/or German is strongly
recommended for those planning to pursue graduate studies in the field.

4. Two additional courses from Archaeology and related disciplines, at least one of which
must be numbered 200 or above, chosen from the following:
ARCH/ANTH/REL 401 (Field Archaeology)
Other ARCH courses excluding 348/448 (colloquium) and 402*
HIST 210 or REL 323 (not counting as a core course)
Anthropology (ANTH 114, 229, 230, 232, 310, 320, 334, 344)
Biblical literature (REL 113, 114, 333, 337, 433)
Ceramics (ART 119 or 229)
Classical literature and rhetoric (ENGL 218, 225)
Geology (ASTR 102 or 112, 104)
Greek philosophy (PHIL 301)
Judaism and Islam (HIST 232; REL 210, 211, 212)
Middle Eastern politics /political conflict (PSCI 342, 361, 362, 367)

Other courses from the fields of art, economics, history, literature, philosophy, political
science, and religion (or other related fields), including independent study projects, may be
substituted subject to approval by the supervisory committee.

*ARCH 402 may be applied to the major as an extra course, but may not take the place of a
4-credit course.

Capstone Requirements

The capstone experience consists of the following components:
1) Practical Experience:
All students must either:
a) participate in an approved archaeological field school (students must keep and
submit a journal documenting all aspects of the experience); or
b) complete a relevant internship (students must keep and submit a journal
documenting the experience).

2) Colloquium Presentation:
Majors are required to give a colloquium presentation, normally in their senior year. The
presentation is normally based on the student’s ARCH 449 seminar research
project and/or practical experience and must present significant independent research
relating to archaeology.

3) Portfolio:
Senior majors must submit a portfolio of their best work from contributing courses,
representing their level of mastery in the related disciplines. The portfolio will also
include a short essay briefly reflecting on the student’s experience in the major.
The portfolio and dig/internship journal will be submitted for approval at the time of
the senior colloquium presentation or within one week thereafter, along with a hard
copy of the colloquium presentation and write-up of underlying research. The final
seminar paper and subsequently completed major papers will be added during the final
semester as they are completed.

Diversity and Writing Courses

The following courses satisfy the Global Cultural Diversity Requirement: ANTH 229, 230, 232, 310, 320, 344; ARHI 222; PSCI 367; REL 226, 323, and 328. The following courses satisfy either the Domestic or Global Diversity Requirement: REL 210, 211, 212, and 333. The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the writing requirement: ANTH 232, 310; ARCH 449; ARHI 222; ENGL 218, 225; HIST 210; PHIL 301; REL 323, 333, 337, and 433.

Minor Requirements

An interdisciplinary minor in Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East and
Mediterranean requires completion of one archaeology course from REL 226 or ANTH/ARCH/
REL 401, and four additional 4-credit courses – at least three of which must be numbered 200 or
higher – from:

ANTH/ARCH/ REL 401 Field Archaeology
ANTH 114, 229, 230, 232, 310, 334, or 320 Anthropology (only one allowed)
ANTH 344 Anthropological Theory
ARHI 222 Survey of Art I: Ancient, Medieval, and Non-Western
ASTR 102 or 112 Geology
HIST 210 Ancient History
HIST 232 or REL 212 Islam
REL 226 Biblical Archaeology
REL 323 Hellenistic-Roman Cultural World
REL 328 History and Culture of the Ancient Near East
REL 113, 114, 210, 333, 337, or 433 Biblical or Judaic studies (only one allowed)
Other ARCH courses at the discretion of the supervisory committee

At least two of these courses must have a prefix other than REL.

201
INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY METHOD AND THEORY
Archaeology is the study of past cultures and societies through their material remains. This course utilizes actual field experience along with laboratory exercises, text-based instruction, and discussion to introduce archaeological field methods as applied in the context of modern American archaeological investigation, along with the theory underlying them. A variety of techniques for investigating, reconstructing, interpreting, preserving, and ultimately learning from the past are also examined and utilized. A basic human cultural chronology for Native American civilization is established as a context for understanding important ideological and socio-economic factors. The fieldwork component of the course includes site testing and preliminary assessment, development of research design, establishment of an excavation grid, and excavation by both arbitrary and natural strata. Students also identify, label, and catalog artifacts; complete site records; provide top plans and balk drawings; and contribute to a final site report. Additional lab fee and lab times required for excavation. Alternate years.

348
JUNIOR ARCHAEOLOGY COLLOQUIUM
A forum for senior presentations, faculty and outside speakers relating to archaeology, plus occasional outside workshops and events. This course is a pre-requisite for ARCH 448. Students considering study abroad in the fall of their junior year should take ARCH 348 in the fall of their sophomore year if possible. 1-2 hours per week. Pass/Fail. Non-credit seminar.

401
FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY
Participation in an approved archaeological dig or field school program, usually in the Near East or Mediterranean region. Includes instruction in excavation techniques, recording and processing of artifacts. A survey of excavation and research and the use of archaeology as a tool for elucidating historical and cultural changes. Under certain circumstances, participation in an archaeological field school in North, Central, or South America or elsewhere may be accepted. Cross-listed as ANTH 401, and as REL 401 for Mediterranean and Near Eastern digs only. Students desiring credit toward the Religion major or Humanities Distribution Requirement should register for REL 401; students desiring credit toward the Anthropology major or Social Science Distribution Requirement should register for ANTH 401; students desiring credit toward the Archaeology major should register for ARCH 401. Special fees apply. May Term or Summer Sessions only.

402
TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH
Directed research in archaeology, normally conducted in conjunction with an archaeological excavation project. A substantial research paper is required, making significant use of archaeological data and highlighting the relationship between field archaeology and history, art history, or related archaeological sciences. Possible topics for work in Cyprus could include ancient trade, city-state development in Cyprus, relations between Cyprus and the Levant, and Cyprus in an ancient Near Eastern context. Other topics are possible with approval of the instructor. Research in Cyprus is conducted at the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute and the library of the Department of Antiquities of Cyprus. Corequisite ANTH/ARCH/REL 401 or consent of instructor. 2 credits. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent when topics are different.

421
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SUPERVISION
Participation in an archaeological excavation or field school program at the level of assistant supervisor or above. Includes instruction in on-site supervision of daily digging, record-keeping, and interpretation of finds, and/or specialized training in excavation project coordination, data processing, or analysis of specific types of material culture. Research project required. Prerequisite: ANTH/ARCH/REL 401 or equivalent experience. Special fees apply. May Term or Summer Sessions only.

448
SENIOR ARCHAEOLOGY COLLOQUIUM
A forum for senior presentations, faculty and outside speakers relating to archaeology, plus occasional outside workshops and events. 1-2 hours per week. Non-credit seminar. Prerequisite: ARCH 348 or consent of instructor.

449
ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY AND METHOD
This seminar acquaints the student with the evolution of archaeological thinking over the past century. Current archaeological theory is covered in some detail; students will learn to identify, examine, and evaluate specific theories. Each student also prepares and presents a substantial research project. Prerequisite: One course in ANTH numbered 200 or above; and two courses from ARHI 222, REL 226, 323, or 328; and an excavation or internship experience, or consent of instructor. Corequisite ARCH 448.

470-479
INTERNSHIP
Interns in archaeology usually work in historical museums or art museums under the supervision of a museum director/curator/archaeologist and a member of the faculty. Course can also be designated as ANTH, ART, HIST, or REL and taken through the relevant department.

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY
This course represents an opportunity to pursue specific research interests not usually covered in regular courses. Course can also be designated as ANTH, ART, HIST, or REL and taken through the relevant department.