Lycoming College collects 1,200 books for teacher in New Mexico

Lycoming College collects 1,200 books for teacher in New Mexico

WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - The Lycoming College education department recently held a book drive that collected more than 1,200 books for Kristen Forgotch, a 2011 Lycoming graduate who is teaching on a Native American reservation in New Mexico.

More than 1,000 books were donated from Partners in Progress, a nonprofit agency in Mansfield that trains individuals with disabilities. The additional donations were received during the education conference, “Mind in the Making,” which was held April 19 at the college. The conference hosted more than 400 people, who collectively donated more than 225 books.

The book drive was funded by a Curriculum Enrichment grant through the college. The project was assisted by Colleen Fox, of the education department, and Lycoming students Elise Matalavage, a freshman from Milton, Del., and James Tyson, a junior from Etters.

According to Forgotch, the books are important because the children on the reservation come from a very high level of poverty.

“Some of the kids also do not have running water, so books and education are not a priority for families,” she said. “Having my alma mater support me after graduation means the world to me. It shows me that Lycoming cares about its students as people. Many of the other teachers at my school have commented that Lycoming must be a school that really cares.”

Lycoming College is a four-year, residential liberal arts and sciences school dedicated to the undergraduate education of 1,400 students. Its rigorous academic program, vibrant residential community and supportive faculty foster successful student outcomes. Lycoming offers 36 academic majors and is recognized as a Tier 1 institution by U.S. News & World Report. Founded in 1812 and located near the banks of the Susquehanna River in Williamsport, Pa., Lycoming is one of the 50 oldest colleges in the nation. For more information, visit www.lycoming.edu.

Useful Resources