Aerial view of campus with Williamsport, the Susquehanna River and Bald Eagle Mountain as a backdrop

Communication (CCOM, CPCOM, FVA, FILM)

Associate Professor: Peterson (Chair)
Assistant Professors: Decky, Donati
Instructors: Fausey, Van Auken

  • Majors: Computational Communication, Corporate Communication, Film and Video Arts
  • Film and Video Arts Tracks: Visual Media, Digital Filmmaking
  • Courses required for Computational Communication or Corporate Communication major: 12
  • Courses required for either Film and Video Arts track: 13
  • Non-credit Colloquium: 4 semesters
  • Computational Communication or Corporate Communication Capstone requirement: CCOM 400 or 440
  • Film and Video Arts Capstone requirement: FVA 400
  • Minors: Corporate Communication, Film and Video Arts, Film Studies

A major in communication with a liberal arts base is the perfect choice for students interested in

2D animation, digital filmmaking, motion graphics, video editing, film and video production and post-production, computational communication, corporate communication, advertising, public relations, management and financial communication, marketing communication, and media relations.

The department offers majors in Computational Communication, Corporate Communication, and Film and Video Arts and minors in Corporate Communication, Film and Video Arts, and Film Studies. Students balance theory and practice as they study the way media interacts with society and are introduced to a variety of media in their courses, extracurricular activities, independent projects, and internships.

Computational Communication (CPCOM)

Computational Communication is an interdisciplinary major designed to prepare students for the rapidly growing fields of advertising technology, marketing technology, and related fields. The program leads to professional opportunities in corporate communication, advertising, consulting, and communication technology management.

Major Requirements

All students majoring in Computational Communication must complete a total of 12 courses, distributed as follows:

I. Required Corporate Communication courses (five courses):

  • CCOM 200     Introduction to Corporate Communication
  • CCOM 324     Public Relations
  • CCOM 332     Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communication
  • CCOM 335     Public Communication of Science
  • CCOM 400 Corporate Communication Strategy or CCOM 440 Capstone Research Project

II. Required Mathematics and Computer Science Courses (five courses):

  • CPTR 125       Introduction to Computer Science
  • CPTR 322       Introduction to Web-based Programming
  • CPTR 339       Introduction to Database Management
  • MATH 115     Applied Discrete Mathematics, or MATH 216 Discrete Mathematics
  • MATH 123     Introduction to Statistics

III. Elective Courses (select two courses):

  • ACCT 320      Accounting Information Systems/Fund Accounting
  • BIO 215          Introduction to GIS
  • BUS 228         Marketing Principles
  • BUS 342         Marketing Research
  • BUS 438         Quantitative Financial Analytics
  • CPTR 246       Principles of Advanced Programming
  • CPTR 247       Data Structures
  • ECON 227      Game Theory
  • ENTR 325       Digital Marketing
  • FVA 322         Visual Media in the Digital Age

Capstone Requirement

All majors must successfully complete CCOM 400 Corporate Communication Strategy or 440 Capstone Research Project.

Writing Courses

A list of courses that, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the Writing Requirement, can be found on the Registrar’s website and in the GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS section of the catalog.

Corporate Communication (CCOM)

Corporate Communication is an inter-disciplinary major designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in business, government, non-profit, political, policy, international, or non-governmental organizations. The program leads to professional opportunities in corporate communication, public relations, advertising, marketing communication, public affairs, advocacy, media relations, human resources, change management, investor relations, science and environmental communication, international communication, and related fields.

Major Requirements

All students majoring in Corporate Communication must complete a total of 12 credits, distributed as follows:

I. Required Core Communication courses (five courses), plus colloquia:

  • CCOM 200 — Introduction to Corporate Communication
  • CCOM 210 — Writing for Corporate Communication
  • CCOM 324 — Public Relations
  • CCOM 332 — Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communication
  • CCOM 146, 246, 346, 446: four semester of non-credit colloquium

And one of either:

  • FVA 100 — Introduction to Visual Media
  • FVA 200 — Digital Film and Video Production I

II. Core business-related courses (two courses):

  • BUS 228 — Marketing Principles

And one of either:

  • ECON 110 — Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECON 111 — Principles of Microeconomic

III. Quantitative Course (one course):

  • ACCT 110 — Financial Accounting
  • CPTR 125 — Introduction to Computer Science
  • MATH 115 — Applied Discrete Mathematics
  • MATH 123 — Introduction to Statistics

IV. Communication capstone (one course):

  • CCOM 400 — Corporate Communication Strategy
  • CCOM 440 — Capstone Research Project

V. Elective Courses (select three courses). Other related courses may be substituted with departmental approval:

  • ANTH 103 — Cultural Anthropology
  • BUS 238 — Fundamentals of Financial Management
  • BUS 244 — Management and Organizational Behavior
  • BUS 333 — Global Business Strategies
  • BUS 342 — Marketing Research
  • BUS 429 — Marketing Strategies
  • CCOM 211 — Informative and Persuasive Speaking
  • CCOM 221 -- Events Planning
  • CCOM 330 — Topics in Corporate Communication
  • CCOM 333 — Financial Communication
  • CCOM 334 -- Public Communication of Science
  • CCOM 400 — Corporate Communication Strategy
  • CCOM 440 — Capstone Research Project
  • CCOM 470 — Internship
  • ECON 220 — Money and Banking
  • PHIL 216 — Business Ethics
  • PSCI 220 — Public Policy in America
  • PSCI 261 — International Organizations
  • PSCI 316 — Public Opinion and Polling
  • PSCI 338 — Environmental Law and Politics

Capstone Requirement

All majors must successfully complete CCOM 400 or 440.

Writing Courses

A list of courses that, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the Writing Requirement, can be found on the Registrar’s website and in the GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS section of the catalog.

Minor Requirements

The Corporate Communication minor will enhance the content of any major area of study with an additional set of marketable skills in communication and public relations for business, nonprofits, and political, policy, or public interest groups. Five courses are required: CCOM 200, CCOM 210, two other CCOM courses, and one additional course that counts toward the CCOM major.

200
INTRODUCTION TO CORPORATE COMMUNICATION
Introduces 1) the functional disciplines within corporate communication, including media relations, investor relations, employee relations, and community relations; 2) stakeholder management and issues management as core competencies of corporate communication; 3) the purposes and organization of a corporation; and 4) the relations among corporate and personal reputation, responsibility, and ethics. Information and insights from this course are applicable equally to non-profit, for-profit, or public sector organizations.

210
WRITING FOR CORPORATE COMMUNICATION
Instruction and practice in tactical writing skills to attain the entry-level competence expected for professionals in public relations and corporate communication. These skill sets include messaging; document formats and document distribution; writing for aural, oral, digital, and traditional communication; speechwriting; writing news releases; and media relations. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107 or consent of instructor.

211
INFORMATIVE AND PERSUASIVE SPEAKING
Training in methods of informative and persuasive speaking, including formal speeches, impromptu situations, presentations, and persuasion in critical situations. Emphasizes the basic elements of effective public discourse: audience analysis, organization, content, and presentation skills. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.

221
EVENTS PLANNING
An introduction to events planning and management, which includes event design, marketing, operations, logistics, risk, staffing, and finance. Includes planning and management of corporate, non-profit, sports, arts, cultural and mega-events, and conventions. Alternate years.

324
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Considers the practice, theory, philosophy, ethics, and history of public relations. Appraises the capacity of public relations 1) to inform; 2) to persuade; 3) to cause, maintain, or change events and perceptions; and 4) to foster strategic business choices and decisions through rhetorical means. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.

330
TOPICS IN CORPORATE COMMUNICATION
Study of communication theory as applied to a special area of corporate communication through readings, discussion, and applications. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or CCOM 200 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics are different.

332
ADVERTISING & INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION
An introduction to advertising and integrated marketing communication (IMC), this course links communication theory to practice fundamentals, such as branding, segmentation, targeting, message development, creative execution, and media planning. It details the growth of advertising into the broader field of IMC due to the dominance of brand, media fragmentation, and increased customer empowerment, among other forces.

333
FINANCIAL COMMUNICATION
Financial communication combines its core discipline – communication – with elements from corporate finance, law, accounting, information technology, management, and marketing. Its primary purpose is to sustain a company’s reputation, financial standing, and optimum valuation. Covers the role of information in the capital markets, formal and informal disclosure of material information, relevant US securities law and regulations, corporate governance, and working with investors, potential investors, financial analysts, and the financial media. No mathematics required. Prerequisite: CCOM 200; or an ACCT, BUS, or ECON course; or consent of instructor. 

335
PUBLIC COMMUNICATION OF SCIENCE
Effective communication increases the odds that science and scientists can have a maximum positive impact on society. Yet science-based issues often remain shrouded in misperception and misunderstanding by laypersons, undercutting science in policy discussions and business decisions. This course exposes students to science, health care, environmental, energy, and natural resources communication. It examines the ways trained scientists and professionals think and communicate differently and for different purposes than the public-at-large. The course looks at the popularization of science, the polarization of science issues, and the core concepts of risk communication. Alternate years.

400
CORPORATE COMMUNICATION STRATEGY
An integrative course in issues management, crisis management, planning, and evaluation, students learn organized and conscientious approaches for using communication to support  business strategy, to manage reputation, and to solve business problems. Prerequisites: CCOM 200, 210, and 324. Alternate years.

440
CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJECT
Students about to enter careers in advertising, marketing communication, public relations, or corporate communication go deep into one final single, semester-long, individual assignment of the student’s choice, with the instructor’s guidance and permission. Most often the assignment takes the form of a thesis of original research using literature reviews and qualitative or quantitative methods. Prerequisites: CCOM 200 and 324. Alternate years.

146, 246, 346 and 446
CORPORATE COMMUNICATION COLLOQUIUM
Students are required to complete successfully the non-credit colloquium for a total of four semesters through academic experiences such as WRLC, The Lycourier, and Crossing The Frame Productions. Enrollment in other similar on and off-campus academic experiences will be accepted with departmental approval. Pass/Fail. Non-credit.

470
INTERNSHIP
Interns usually work off-campus in fields related to their areas of study. Students must apply for departmental and College approval prior to registration to be eligible for this course.  Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. 1-8 credits.

Film and Video Arts (FVA)

Film and Video Arts is an innovative, interdisciplinary major with a strong relationship to other disciplines at the college including art, theater, creative writing, electronic music, business, sociology, political science, and history. The boundaries between video, film, multimedia production, web design, digital sound, photography, graphic design, and performance are collapsing as quickly as digital technology is expanding. The Film and Video Arts curriculum at Lycoming College is grounded in the tradition of liberal arts and teaches the theory, skills, and grammar of the visual language necessary to work within this rapidly changing technology. Upper level studio and theory courses and the opportunity to do a professional internship provide the conceptual, technical, and theoretical knowledge necessary to create compelling films and videos and compete in the field.

Major Requirements

All students majoring in Film and Video Arts must complete the core courses and at least one of the two concentrations listed below:

Core Courses:

  • ART 212 — Color and Design
  • ART 227 or 345 — Photography I or Digital Photography I
  • FVA 200 — Digital Film and Video Production I
  • FVA 300 — Digital Film and Video Production II
  • FVA 340 — Special Topics in Filmmaking and Video
  • FVA 400 — Digital Film and Video III/Senior Project
  • FILM 114 — Film Art: Motion Picture Masterpieces

Participation in the Senior Film and Video festival is also required.

Choose two:

  • BUS 228 — Marketing Principles
  • CCOM 200 — Introduction to Corporate Communication
  • CCOM 332 — Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communication
  • Any ENTR course

Film and Video Arts Colloquium

FVA 148, 248, 348, 448 (Pass/Fail. Non-credit.)

Choose one Concentration:

Visual Media:

ART 343; ART 344 or 430; any ARHI course numbered 300 or higher (including FVA 322); and one of the following three classes: ART 429, FVA 320, or FVA 330.

Digital Filmmaking:

FVA 320 or 330; FILM 221; FILM 214 or 220; any one FILM course numbered 300 or higher. ART 343 is recommended but not required.

Capstone Requirement

All majors must successfully complete FVA 400.

Diversity and Writing Courses

The following courses satisfy the Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement: ARHI 320/FVA 322, Film 114 and 214, and FVA 322. A list of courses that, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the Writing Requirement, can be found on the Registrar’s website and in the GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS section of the catalog.

Minor Requirements

The Film and Video Arts minor will be of interest to students who want to use film and digital media as a form to communicate the content of their majors. Students of various majors might want to create a documentary film or educational website on the subject of their senior research. Minors in Film and Video Arts  may pursue graduate studies and/or employment in a variety of fields including film or video production, advertising, and cultural analysis. Six courses are required: ART 227 and 343; FVA 200 and 300; any FILM course numbered 200 or higher; and one course selected from ART 344, FVA 320, or FVA 330.

100
INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL MEDIA
Through a combination of lectures, screenings, and hands-on demonstrations, this course is an introduction to the history and methodology behind the digital processes of a broad range of visual media as it is used in advertising, filmmaking, digital video, and photography. Not open to students who have received credit for FVA 200. Does not count toward the FVA major.

120
STOP MOTION ANIMATION
Takes the student through various aspects of stop motion animation. Includes analyzing animation shorts, developing concepts, and the production of stop motion animations. Emphasis is on conceptualization, creativity, and visual aesthetics. Intended for beginners (experience with creating videos or films is not necessary).

200
DIGITAL FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION I
Introduces students to the basics of digital image making as it applies to the moving image. Topics include the principles, techniques, and fundamentals of digital photography and digital video.

300
DIGITAL FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION II
A continuation of the skills developed in FVA 200, including film and video project research, title sequences, and storyboards. An introduction to digital image manipulation and motion graphics as they apply to film and video. Prerequisite: FVA 200 or consent of instructor. ART 343 is strongly recommended but not required.

310
THE MOVING IMAGE IN SERIES
This production course prepares students to work with the moving image as a series of video shorts that stem from one concept or idea. The course is strongly encouraged for the FVA major; it aids in preparation for the senior project. Prerequisite: FVA 300 or consent of  instructor.

320
NARRATIVE FILMMAKING
An introduction to fiction filmmaking through lecture, screenings, and hands-on demonstrations. Principles of cinematography, technical processes, and continuity editing are covered. Students also discuss storytelling techniques and analyze the techniques used by established filmmakers. Prerequisite: FVA 300 and FILM 221 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

322
VISUAL MEDIA IN THE DIGITAL AGE
The historical study of new media, with emphasis on video and interactive art forms, in relationship to the development of television, the World Wide Web, and social networks. Cross-listed as ARHI 320. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement. Alternate years.

330
DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
Through a combination of lecture, screening, and hands-on demonstrations, this course familiarizes students with planning, writing, developing, and shooting non-fiction films. Students also discuss storytelling techniques and analyze the techniques used by established filmmakers. Prerequisite: FVA 300. Alternate years.

340
SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILMMAKING AND VIDEO
Study of selected subject matter such as Motion Graphics and Special Effects, Advanced Stop Motion Animation, Lighting and Green Screen, or Installation Video. Prerequisite: FVA 300 or consent of instructor.

400
DIGITAL FILM AND VIDEO III / SENIOR PROJECT
Advanced production of documentary, narrative, or experimental video, multi-media, or interactive media incorporating advanced directing, shooting, lighting, sound, effects, and editing. The capstone course for the Film and Video Arts major. Prerequisite: FVA 300 and senior status or consent of instructor.

148, 248, 348, 448
FILM AND VIDEO ARTS COLLOQUIUM
Students are required to successfully complete the non-credit Colloquium for a total of four semesters through academic experiences such as WRLC and Crossing the Frame Productions. Enrollment in other similar academic experiences on or off campus can be accepted with departmental approval. Pass/Fail. Non-credit.

Film Studies (FILM)

The minor in Film Studies develops skills in media writing and the critical analysis of film, television, and video as an art form. Minors develop skills in researching film history and thinking creatively about contemporary attitudes, values, and beliefs associated with film. Five courses are required: FILM 114, two FILM courses at the 200 level, and two FILM courses at the 300 level.

114
FILM ART: MOTION PICTURE MASTERPIECES
Study of selected classic experimental and narrative films from around the world as well as from Hollywood. Consideration of what makes a classic through examination of such topics as acting, writing, directing, style, and genre. Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement.  Alternate years.

212
MULTICULTURAL AMERICA ON SCREEN
Introduction to the art of understanding moving images to discover the cultural values of American filmmakers and their audiences. Comparison of the ways in which films and television use comedy, drama, and the documentary to examine topics having to do with values, beliefs, and cultural diversity in America.

214
SURVEY OF LANDMARKS IN FILM HISTORY
Close reading of selected films from around the world in an historical context using basic film theory to guide the reading with a major emphasis on cinematography, editing, and mise-en-scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.  Fulfills Domestic Cultural Diversity Requirement.  

220
TOPICS IN GENRES, ACTORS, AND DIRECTORS.
Comparative study of film genres, directors, and/or performers from an historical perspective. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107. May be repeated for credit when topics are different.

221
INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING
Training in methods of creating the original screenplay for film and/or television. Emphasis is placed on scene and plot construction, character development, and using the language of film to tell a story. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

300
FILM AND SOCIAL CHANGE
Close analysis of selected documentary, propaganda, and social problem films that seek to influence our perceptions of reality. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

315
CREATIVITY IN FILM
Study of ground-breaking artists who developed new ways of relating form to content in independent, experimental, animated, and digital films. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

320
TOPICS IN FILM AND CULTURE
Exploration of film and related media texts in a particular historical context. Includes a study of the art, music, literature, political, and social framework of the period and culture under consideration. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107. May be repeated for credit when topics are different.

326
MEDIA CRITICISM
Practice in analyzing print, auditory, visual, and digital texts from a cultural studies point of view. Emphasis is placed on basic methods of semiotic theory and application of structuralist analysis and frame theory. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107 and sophomore standing.