CLOSED CHURCHES WITHIN THE PRESENT BOUNDARIES OF THE

SUSQUEHANNA CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

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ADAMS COUNTY PA


1. Barts UB

Description: Description: Description: barts.jpg

Address: Barts Church Road
Municipality: Union township
County: Adams County
State: PA

Directions:
     From Littlestown, go 2 miles east on PA 194 and then 2 miles south on Barts Church Road.

Historic Conference:
     Pennsylvania Conference of the the United Brethren Church

Journal references:

Brief History:
 
     This congregation traces its origin to an 1840's United Brethren camp meeting on the grounds of John Jones, just over the Mason-Dixon line in Maryland.  The Jones appointment was formed, and they erected their first church building in 1852 on land donated by local exhorter John Bart.  A farewell service was held in the original building on May 8, 1907, before it was razed the following week.  The congregation held services in an adjoining grove during the summer and fall of 1907, and the present structure was dedicated January 12, 1908.  In 1992 Barts merged with Littlestown Centenary (former Methodist Episcopal) to form Barts-Centenary United Methodist Church a single congregation meeting on two campuses.  The Barts campus was discontinued in 2010.

Final disposition:


2. Beamers EV/ME

beamers

Location: Nawakwa Road
Municipality:
Menallen township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions: 
    From Arendtsville, go 3 miles west on PA 234 to Nawakwa Road.  Turn north on Nawakwa Road and go 1 mile to the intersection with Celebration Hill Road, at which point Nawakwa Road makes a right turn.  The garage pictured above sits on Nawakwa Road a stone's throw past southeast corner of that intersection.  The church stood just east of the garage.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Association
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:
Methodist
   
1897,65 - Beamers church building bought and paid for
    1898, Statistics #5 (York Springs circuit) - last mention of Beamers in the Methodist annual conference journal

Brief History:
    In 1853, area citizens (the names Beamer, Burkholder and Oyler appear in this context) were named to erect a meeting house on the site.  In 1870, the property was formally deeded to trustees Solomon Beamer. John Mackly and Alexander D. Oyler of the Evangelical Association.  In 1871, under the leadership of Rev. James M. Price of the Bendersville charge, a new church building was erected. 
    Later, probably in 1894 at the time of the split in the Evangelical Association, the membership and the property identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church.  A 1957 newspaper article states that the membership of Beamers and Wenksville overlapped "even to the point that they both had some of the same trustees.  Beamers church was torn down in the early 1900's, and at present those people belong to the Wenksville Methodist Church."

Final disposition:
    The site is now an empty lot and part of the surrounding farmland.  There apparently was a cemetery there, as there were once gravestones piled behind the garage.


3. Bendersville EV

Description: Description: Bendersville

Location: North Main Street, Bendersville
Municipality:
borough of Bendersville
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    The church stood on the northeast corner of the Main Street and the second cross street/alley north of the square.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
   
Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Association

Journal references:

Brief History:
    Evangelical preaching in Bendersville can be documented as early as 1839.  Services were held in a union building in which all denominations worshipped, until one-by-one they each erected their own structures.  The Evangelical chapel was dedicated May 31, 1857.  The group was better known locally as the Albright Church (after denominational founder Jacob Albright) rather than the Evangelical Association.  The congregation is the subject of an article in Volume XVIII (spring 2007) of The Chronicle, pages 34-39.  They became the home congregation of the Bendersville charge, which was created in 1870 and existed up to the time of the 1891-94 denominational troubles.
    The 1894 denominational split effectively ended all the Evangelical work in Adams County (except for Idaville, along the northern boundary of the county).  The property was transferred from the Evangelical Association to the newly formed United Evangelical denomination on September 3, 1895.  But without prospects of a continuing congregation, The United Evangelical Church sold the property to Montana Lodge #653 of the I.O.O.F. the following month on October 12, 1895.  Before building was sold to the Odd Fellows, the pulpit, altar, pews and other church furnishings were sold to the soon to be dedicated Idaville United Brethren Church (Old Constitution).

Final disposition:
   
The property is now an empty lot.


4. Center Mills Bethlehem UB

Description: Description: center mills

Location: Old Carlisle Road, just north of Center Mills
Municipality:
Butler township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
   
From Biglerville, go east on PA 234 two miles to Old Carlisle Road.  Go north on Old Carlisle Road 1.5 miles, through the village of Center Mills.  The site is just north of Center Mills, along the left side of the road.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren Church.

Journal references:

Brief History:
    The church was erected in 1860 on land donated Mr. and Mrs. Edward Staley.  Prime motivator for the project was Elias Guise, a former Methodist, who served as the class leader for many years.  The congregation never recovered from the denominational split of 1889 and the presence of the Mt. Olivet United Brethren (Old Constitution) church building erected about a mile away, between Centre Mills and Biglerville.  By 1952 the building was badly in need of repair and the remaining 25 members were transferred to the Centenary congregation in Biglerville. 
    Annual homecoming services were held until 1960, when the church celebrated its 100th anniversary.  In 1964 the bell was removed from the bell tower to replace the one at Centenary, which was no longer usable.  The building collapsed during a winter storm in 1968 and was razed.

Final disposition:
    The remaining cemetery is maintained by the Biglerville Centenary United Methodist Church.  Since 1971 a scale replica of the edifice in the cemetery marks the spot of the original building.


5. Chamberlain ME

Description: Description: Chamberlain

Location: Mount Carmel Road, 2.5 miles west of Orrtanna
Municipality:
Franklin township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From the village of Orrtanna, go 2.5 miles west on Mount Carmel Road.  The building stood across the road from the cemetery.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:

Brief History:
    This congregation grew out of a rural appointment filled by a circuit rider and meeting at the Chamberlain home.  The church building was erected in 1850 on land donated by John Chamberlain.  It was a stone building with separate entrances and seating for the men and the women.  An 1857 obituary for Catherine Chamberlain, wife David, states that "she, with her husband, became members of the Methodist Episcopal Church almost thirty years ago, during the greater part of which their home was a preaching place where the itinerant always found a cordial welcome." 
    By 1890 the congregation had become too large for the structure.  Since most of the congregation lived in the village of Orrtanna, the new building was erected there in 1892.

Final disposition:
    At the August 2, 1896, quarterly conference of Littlestown circuit, permission was given the Orrtanna trustees “to sell or dispose of the furnishings and lumber, stone, etc. of the old church known as Chamberlains.” The cemetery is maintained by the Orrtanna United Methodist Church.


6. Clines UB

Description: Description: Clines

Location: Clines Church Road, off PA 34, between Biglerville and Idaville
Municipality:
Menallen township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From Biglerville, go 5 miles north on PA 34 to the intersection with Gabler Road (west) and Center Mills Road (east).  Twenty yards past the intersection, Clines Church Road (the old route 34) goes off to left (and rejoins PA 34 in 1.5 miles).  Go one mile on Clines Church Road.  The stone chapel and cemetery are on the right.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren Church.

Journal references:

Brief History:
   
Clines Church was erected in 1850.  Before that time, Sunday school was held in the school house in the nearby village of Gardners, and the circuit rider filled the weekday appointment at the home of Joseph Cline, who lived on the large farm immediately adjoining the church property to the north.  The membership never was large, and the church was closed for several years in the 1950's.  In 2003, the building was approved for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  The congregation was discontinued in 2008.

Final disposition:
    The cemetery is the property of the Clines Cemetery Association.  The church building was sold to the R & L Orchard Company, whose lands surround the property, for possible use as a field office. 


7. East Berlin Trinity EV

Description: Description: East Berline EV

Location: southwest corner of Locust and Fourth Streets, East Berlin
Municipality:
borough of East Berlin
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From the square in East Berlin, travel west on King Street (PA 234) 4 blocks to Fourth Street.  Go south (left) on Fourth Street 2 blocks to Locust Street. 

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Association/United Evangelical Church

Journal references:
    1914,75 – authorization to sell, proceeds towards debt on Wellsville circuit parsonage

Brief History:
    The Evangelical Association purchased a lot in New Berlin and erected a church building in 1879.  In the denominational split of 1894, the congregation sided with the United Evangelical faction and had to purchase (through an intermediary) the property from the Evangelical Association.  The appointment was part of the Wellsville charge.  By 1914, however, there was only one member remaining, there had been no regular services for two years, and the building was deteriorating.  The property was sold that year to Washington Camp #159 of the P.O.S.A. [Patriotic Order of the Sons of America], which owned the building until 1945.  The structure was then sold to Curtis A. Eisenhart, longtime East Berlin borough secretary, who converted it nto a home and lived there for many years.  The building burned to the ground on February 12, 1986. 

Final disposition:
    A modern house occupies the site.


8. East Berlin ME

Description: Description: East Berlin ME

Location: West King Street (PA 234), New Berlin
Municipality:
borough of East Berlin
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    The site is on the north side of West King Street (PA 234), on the northeast corner of the alley between Fourth and Fifth Streets. The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building ― but the cross streets have been renumbered since 1872, and what the atlas shows as being between 3rd and 4th Streets  is now between 4th and 5th Streets.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Journal references:

Brief History:
   
Because this congregation was never very strong and existed for only a short time, its history is vague.  It appears that a board of trustees was appointed in 1844, solicitations for contractors for advertised in 1850, the cornerstone was laid in 1851, and the building was completed and occupied in 1854.  It was brick building of medium size and part of the York Springs charge.  The congregation struggled, and permission to sell the building was granted in 1865 and in 1873 ― but the congregation managed to continue.  Finally, in 1886, the property was purchased by Michael McSherry and converted into a home ― and occupied as such in good condition for over 100 years.

Final disposition:
   
The structure was torn down in 1994 to extend the parking lot across the alley.


9. Fairfield ME

Description: Description: X:\image\closed_churchs\adams\fairfield.jpg

Location: W. Main Street (PA 116), Fairfield
Municipality:
borough of Fairfield
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    The church stood on the northwest corner of Main Street (PA 116) and 8th Avenue.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:
   
1877,41 - church dedicated Thanksgiving Day 1876
    1933,61 - authorization to sell the Fairfield property and apply to proceeds to the Orrtanna church property
    1935,66 - Fairfield property "abandoned for years" sold 7/30/1934 for $200

Brief History:
    The congregation was organized about 1827 and worshipped in private homes until 1830 when the first church was erected.  A new building, named Centennial Methodist Episcopal Church, was dedicated on the same site on November 30, 1876.  The congregation never was very large, and its last reported membership was 21 in 1921.  It appears to have stopped being served at that time. 
    The property was sold to the Fairfield School District in 1934, and to Warren R. and Laura R. Jones in 1942.  It and the entire block eventually became the property of the Fairfield Shoe Company ― but the entire complex was destroyed by a fire.
    There was also a cemetery behind the church.  The 1886 history of Adams County indicates that the cemetery was "removed", but there were burials there in the 1900's.  County cemetery information states that a factory was built over the cemetery.

Final disposition:
    Since the shoe factory burned, the lots have stood empty.


10. Gardners UB

Description: Description: Gardners

Location: Mountain Road
Municipality:
Latimore township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From the interchange of US 15 and PA 94, go 3 miles north on US 15 to Latimore Creek, where Latimore Creek Road and Mountain Road  intersect US 15.  Turn left on to the cross road, and immediately take the fork to the left.  This is Mountain Road.  Continue for 3 miles.  The church and cemetery are on the right.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren Church

Journal references:
    1969,205 – unused
    1980,A80 – entered closed list
    1990,353 – entered abandoned list
    1993,349 –  sold to the Cemetery Association

Brief History:
    Sometime during the 1846-47 conference year, the pastors of the Littlestown circuit conducted a very successful revival at the Blackberry school House, about two miles from the church.  The following year their successor held a similar meeting in a tent in the immediate vicinity of the church.  The meetings generated many converts, and the need for a church was obvious.  Thomas Gardner donated the land, and the building was dedicated June 15, 1851.  The church is sometimes referred to as the Latimore Church.  While the building underwent significant improvements in 1871, and again in 1894, it never enjoyed an upgrade to indoor plumbing.  The congregation was officially discontinued January 1, 1967.

Final disposition:
    The church and cemetery are being well-maintained by the Cemetery Association.


12. Gettysburg ME 

Description: Description: gettysbburg

 

Location: 34 E. Middle Street
Municipality:
borough of Gettysburg
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    Middle Street runs parallel to and one block south of US 30.  From the square in Gettysburg, go one block south on Baltimore Street and the one half block east on Middle Street.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:

Brief History:
   
While Francis Asbury and/or Freeborn Garrettson may have preached in the area as early as 1783, regular Methodist preaching in Gettysburg did not begin until 1803.  The first class formed in 1815, and the first church building was erected in 1822.  It was a 42.5x37.5' brick structure with a gallery, box seats, and upholstered pulpit furniture.  Located at 55 East Middle Street, that building is now a G.A.R. museum. 
    A new church building was dedicated across the street on February 6, 1874.  A large educational unit was added to the rear of the building in 1958.  On January 20, 1968, the sanctuary was destroyed by arson.  With the union of the Methodist and Evangelical United Brethren denominations scheduled to take place in April 1968, it was decided to merge the two Gettysburg congregations and use the Evangelical United Brethren building on High Street.  The education addition that had been spared in the fire now houses judicial offices for Adams County, with the site of the 1874 serving as the parking lot for that facility.

Final disposition:
    The 34 E. Middle Street site of the 1874 building is now a parking lot for the county offices in the former educational unite at the rearof the property.


13. Gettysburg Asbury ME

Description: Description: Gettysburg Asbury

Location: South Franklin Street, Gettysburg
Municipality:
borough of Gettysburg
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
   

Historic Conference:
    Washington Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:

Brief History:
    The African Methodist Episcopal Zion (AMEZ) denomination was formed in 1820 by African Americans who left the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Those who remained in the parent Methodist Episcopal (ME) denomination were eventually grouped into separate conferences that overlapped boundaries with the corresponding white conferences.  This segregation persisted until 1968.  Asbury ME Church in Gettysburg was part of the black Washington Conference, and not part of the white Central Pennsylvania Conference.
    The congregation was formed by members who left the Gettysburg AMEZ congregation.  On November 22, 1873, a lot was purchased on what is now South Franklin Street, and a church building was erected in 1874.  On April 5, 1889, a lot on S. Washington Street was purchased for a parsonage.  Because the congregation never was very strong and could not support a full-time pastor, it had to be part of a circuit.  But black congregations in the ME church in Pennsylvania were few and far between.  From 1899 to 1910 the Washington Conference had a church in Hanover, and a reasonable two-point charge could be formed.   The church was served by the Washington Conference on a regular basis until 1947 ― and for the last several of those year it was on a charge with a church in Harper Ferry WV.
    A 1956 article in the Gettysburg Times stated that "the leading members of the Asbury ME Church were the Penn family, and for a number of years this was the leading Negro Church" but that its membership "has gradually declined until now only one last member of the Penn family is left" and the church is "supplied for services on an infrequent basis."  Finally the church was discontinued completely.  The parsonage was sold April 23, 1935, and the church building was sold on May 29, 1959.

Final disposition:
    The cornerstone of the 1874 building, shown in the picture above, is part of the collection of the Adams County Historical Society housed in Schmucker Hall.


14. Green Springs Trinity EV

Description: Description: Green Springs

Location: Green Springs Road, village of Green Springs
Municipality:
Berwick township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From the square in Hanover, go 3 miles north on PA 94 (about 1.5 miles after leaving the borough of Hanover) to Green Springs Road.  Turn right and follow Green Springs Road to the village of Green Springs.  The church is in the village on the left.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Church

Journal references:

Brief History:
    The United Evangelical congregation in Green Springs was organized Easter Sunday afternoon, 1911, by the pastor of the Hanover Grace congregation.  Services were to be held every two weeks as an extension of the Hanover ministry.  The cornerstone for a building was laid July 30, 1911, and the building was dedicated October 29, 1911.  During the construction, services were held in a grove near the church site.  In 2001 Green Springs merged into the New Oxford congregation.

Final disposition:
    The structure has been remodeled into a private home.


15. Hampton EV

[no picture]

Location: village of Hampton
Municipality:
Reading township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions: 
    The village of Hampton is between Hanover and York Springs, at the intersection pa PA 94 and PA 394.  The site on which the church was erected in not known. 

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the United Evangelical Church

Journal references:
1901,89 - report of the Committee appointed to inquire into the affairs of the Hampton Church

Brief History:
    The Evangelical Church never actually owned land in Hampton, but they did have enough invested to merit inclusion in this document.  In 1898 an un-named evangelist began the work by stirring up the people to the point where there was interest in forming a congregation and erecting a building.  The presiding elder (district superintendent) arranged for the formation of a board of trustees and a supply pastor, with instructions that they should rent property for the erection of a church.  Lumber was purchased and a church building was erected, but no ground rent was ever paid.  At this point the owner of the land took down the building and claimed the lumber as rent payment, and the lumber merchants and carpenters sued Mr. Miles (the only trustee with any assets) and compelled him to pay $200 for their costs.  The 1901 conference took pledges to reimburse Mr. Miles for his expenses, and that was the end of the Evangelical presence in Hampton.

Final disposition:
   
unknown


16. Hampton Union ME

Description: Description: Hampton

Location: Carlisle Pike (PA 94), village of Hampton
Municipality:
Reading township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
     The square in Hampton, and the buildings on the square, is surrounded by a square formed by 4 alleys.  The Methodist church stood on the first lot across the alley off the northwest corner of the square.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:
    1893,63 - "An excellent brick union church, in which we have a third interest, was erected at Hampton, and our service reestablished."
    1897,23 - $175 received for our share in the union church

Brief History:
    This building was was joint and equal effort of the Evangelical Lutheran, English Presbyterian, German Reformed and Methodist Episcopal denominations.  The property was deeded as such on June 22, 1843.  The cornerstone for the first structure was was laid September 16, 1843, and the building was dedicated June 16, 1844.  The present building was erected at the same site in 1893, but apparently with only 3 participating denominations
    The church was part of the York Springs charge, but apparently it was never very strong.  While it is unknown exactly when and how Methodist interest in the building ceased, the appointment is not listed in the 1898 Statistics #5 ― the first listing of individual appointment data in the annual conference journal.  The English Presbyterian congregation worshiping there sold their interest to the Emanuel German Reformed congregation, also worshiping there, on November 10, 1896 ― with the privilege of holding services there four times a year.  It appears that the Methodists sold their interests, presumably also to the German Reformed Church, about the same time.

Final disposition:
    The building is still standing, although not is regular use as a church.


17. Hampton UB

Description: Description: Hampton UB

Location: Stony Point Road (PA 394), village of Hampton
Municipality:
Reading township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    The square in Hampton, and the buildings on the square, is surrounded by a square formed by 4 alleys.  The United Brethren church stood on the first lot across the alley off the southeast corner of the square.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren Church

Journal references:
    1914,40 - "Hampton Church, Bendersville charge, was sold for $400.  The proceeds will be used in [the] new parsonage at Mt. Tabor."

Brief History:
   
The United Brethren society worshiped in the Union Church until their building was dedicated January 30, 1859.   The congregation was part of the Bendersville charge and apparently was never very strong.  Its last reported membership was 11 in 1913, and the building was sold the following year.

Final disposition:
    The site is currently occupied by a cinder block garage.


18. Hunterstown ME

Description: X:\image\closed_churchs\adams\hunterstown.jpg

Location: PA 394, village of Hunterstown
Municipality:
Strabane township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From the intersection of US 30 and US 15, go 4 miles north in US 15 to the intersection with PA 394.  Go 1 miles east to teh village of Hunterstown.  The church is on the left, at the east end of the village.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:
    1968,1095 - discontinued
    1973,93 - sold

Brief History:
    Methodist preachers from Gettysburg held services in the old school house near the eastern end of the village until the first church building was dedicated January 19, 1859.  That building was blown down September 3, 1879, and the present brick building was dedicated April 4, 1880.  The church was on the York Springs charge from its founding until 1968, when the United Methodist Church was formed and the area's former Methodist and EUB charges were re-aligned, and Hunterstown was discontinued.  The property was sold in 1972, with the money realized from the sale used for improvements on the Salem (former EUB) Church on the New Oxford Charge.

Final disposition:
    The building now houses an independent congregation.


19. Kingsdale Emanuel EV

no picture

Location: Georgetown Road
Municipality:
Germany township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    Go southeast from Littlestown on PA 194 3 miles to the village of Kingsdale.  Turn left onto Georgetown Road and go 0.5 miles.  The church stood on the north side of the road, across from a brick house and just west of a medium-sized pond and the old railroad bed.  The 1872 atlas of Adams county indicates the house of John L. Fisher, which was farther to the east.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Association

Journal references:

Brief History:
    A 60x160' plot of land was deeded to the Evangelical Association June 29, 1888, by John and Lucinda Davidson, the latter having received the property from her father John L. Fisher.  Cornerstone laying services were held at the site September 23, 1888, a 28x40' frame church building was erected on the lot, and the structure was dedicated January 20, 1889.  The property was sold at a sheriff's sale, presumably in connection with the 1894 denominational split, on August 25, 1894.  The December 4, 1894, Star & Sentinel reported that the building was later resold to the Lutheran Board of Extension to be a mission for St. John's in Littlestown.  The fate of the building and of that Lutheran mission is not known.

Final disposition:
    The site is now an empty lot.


20. Littlestown UB

Description: Description: littlestown

Location: S. Queen Street, Littlestown
Municipality:
borough of Littlestown
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    Queen Street (PA 97) is the main north-south route through town.  The church stood on the west side of the street, between Charles Street and Lumber Street, on the second lot south of Charles Street.  The first lot south of Charles (i.e., on the corner of Queen and Charles) was the Catholic Church, which has since expanded and taken over the former United Brethren property.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren Church

Journal references:

Brief History:
    This congregation has a long and distinguished history.  The original log building erected in 1822 was one of the first 10 churches constructed in the entire denomination.  It was erected by Philip Bishop Sr. and deeded to United Brethren trustees in 1826 with two restrictions: that the building be freely open top any other society of Christians, and that the property revert to Philip Bishop if the United Brethren society in Littlestown ceased to exist.  A new brick building was erected in 1863.  Among the the prominent ministerial sons of the congregation are James M. Bishop (1821-1891), Jerremiah Philip Bishop, Zephaniah A. Colestock (1824-1924), and William B. Raber (1824-1875).
    Problems started in the 1870's when the Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren Church tried to gain exclusive control of the building, causing hard feelings and driving away several key families.  The 1889 denominational split proved fatal to the already wounded congregation.  The split divided the congregation.  Both groups continued to meet in the building, but neither was strong enough to maintain a viable congregation.  By 1900 the Liberals (new constitution faction) had abandoned the appointment and the Radicals (old constitution faction) were meeting irregularly, if at all.  In 1901 the heirs of Philip Bishop sued to recover the property, and a long court battle and appeals dragged on until 1923.  The building was finally razed in 1925, the property sold to the Catholic Church in 1926, and the proceeds divided among the heirs.

Final disposition:
    The site of the church is now a lawn in front lawn of St. Aloysius School.


21. Mount Pleasant EV

Description: X:\image\closed_churchs\adams\mtpleasantev.jpg

Location: Narrow Drive
Municipality:
Conewago township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    The community of Mt. Pleasant is at a crossroads on PA 194, one mile west of Hanover.  The crossroad  is Mt. Pleasant Road heading north, and Narrows Drive heading south.  Go south on Narrows Drive about 20 yards to where the road takes a sharp curve to the right.  The church stood on the triangle of ground to left, between the present road and the imaginary extensions of the road before and after the sharp curve.

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Association

Journal references:

Brief History:
    The church was dedicated on Christmas Day, 1878, and was a frame building 26x38 feet.  It was supplied regularly until the 1894 denominational split.  At  this point the congregation ceased to exist.  The property was sold in 1895 at a sheriff's sale and purchased in 1896 by the Lutherans.  The 1886 History of Adams County refers to the structure as the Lutheran and Union Church, and so it appears that the Lutherans were using the building prior to 1896 and may have been the dominant congregation ― even though it clearly was erected and dedicated as an Evangelical Association edifice.

Final disposition:
    The site of the church is an extended front yard of modern homes sitting along the curve in the road.


22. Mount Zion UB

Description: Description: mt.zion

Location: Baltimore Pike (PA 97), just east of the interchange with us 15
Municipality:
Mount Joy township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    From the interchange of US and PA 97, go east toward Gettysburg 0.5 miles.  The site is on the right.  The church stood in the large yard in front of the house and west (i.e., to the right) of the building along the highway.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren in Christ

Journal references:

Brief History:
    The first church was a small frame building, dedicated May 5, 1869.  A new church was dedicated Easter Sunday, April 27, 1887.  The new structure was a 34x46 frame structure with a recessed pulpit and arched ceiling.  The church was on the Littlestown circuit.  Apparently the work did not prosper and the property was sold in 1896 to John Trostle and J.Oliver Blocher.  One of the selling trustees was Alexander D. Oyler (1836-1918), who had been an 1870 trustee of the Beamers Evangelical Church which appears in this list.
    In 1897 the building was purchased by the Marsh Creek congregation of the German Baptist Brethren, of which J. Oliver Blocher was a trustee.  In 1905 the German Baptist Brethren torn down the building and moved it into Gettysburg, on Stratton Street, and encased it in brick.

Final disposition:
    The property where the church was located is now the large from yard of a private residence.


23. Rock Creek Chapel ME

[no picture]

Location: corner of Barlow and Chapel Roads
Municipality:
Cumberland township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
   
Leave Gettysburg going south on PA 134 for 5 miles.  Just before crossing Rock Creek and entering the village of Barlow, turn right onto Barlow Road.  Go 0.5 miles on Barlow Road to Chapel Road, the first road to the right.  The chapel stood on the northwest corner of the intersection of Barlow and Chapel Roads.  The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates the exact location of the church building. 

Historic Conference:
    Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church

Journal references:
From the Quarterly Conference Minutes of Littlestown circuit
     August 2, 1896: remaining nine members of Rock Creek Chapel released to the Gettysburg charge
     October 3, 1896: the annual apportionment of Rock Creek Chapel was distributed among the four remaining viable appointments – Littlestown, Orrtanna, Union Mills [MD], Fairfield.

Brief History:
    Rock Creek Chapel appears as a regular and active appointment in the Gettysburg circuit books that begins in 1840, presently kept at the Gettysburg UM Church.  It is unclear how much before 1840 the appointment began and/or the building was erected.  In 1876, Gettysburg was made a station and Rock Creek and the other appointments became Littlestown circuit.  From 1883 to 1894, Rock Creek Chapel was attached to Gettysburg to form a two-point charge.  In 1894, Gettysburg was paired with New Oxford and Rock Creek chapel was returned to Littlestown circuit.  The Littlestown circuit records for 1894 list trustees for Rock Creek Chapel, but no class leader.   It is seems that the appointment was no longer viable.  The building is identified as an "M.E. Church" on the 1858 map of Adams County ― and as the 1858 map places the building on the east side of Barlow Road, it is possible that structure of the 1872 atlas is the second building.  This is not to be confused with the Revolutionary War era Presbyterian Rock Creek church northeast of Gettysburg.

Final disposition:
   
There are open fields, with nothing to mark the location of the chapel.


24. York Springs Chapel UB

[no picture]

Location: unknown
Municipality:
Huntington township
County:
Adams
State:
PA

Directions:
    The 1872 atlas of Adams County indicates a school house surrounded by Myers families south of York Springs in southern Huntington township.  This may the site, but the area has been completely relandscaped.

Historic Conference:
    Pennsylvania Conference of the United Brethren in Christ

Journal references:
    1884,4 - "Four new churches have been dedicated during the year ― York Springs Chapel,..."
    1906,25 - "York Springs Chapel, a small church where the preaching appointment was discontinued a number of years ago, was sold and the money used for the parsonage of the Bendersville charge, of which this appointment was a part.

Brief History:
    Surprisingly little is known about this apparently once significant appointment.  That was a York Springs circuit from 1853 (when the former Franklin circuit was so re-named) until 1888 suggests that the appointment and/or the village may have been the strongest in the area and/or the location of the parsonage.  In 1887 the large York Springs circuit was split, and the northern portion became the Dillsburg circuit.  In 1888 the remaining York Springs circuit was demoted to being the York Springs mission (i.e., an appointment that could not support a full-time itinerant on its own) with 6 appointments and 4 organized churches.  In 1892 the York Springs mission was dismantled: Hampton and York Springs Chapel were placed on the Bendersville circuit, Gardners was placed on the Dillsburg circuit, and Mount Victory was placed on the Boiling Springs circuit.  The fact that this dismantling of the once mighty York Springs appointment coincides with the 1889 denominational split is probably more than a coincidence.
    The 1886 History of Adams County, page 294, states the following.  "York Springs Chapel of the United Brethren may be said to date back to 1859.  In 1875 the society purchased the Myers Schoolhouse, fitted it up as a house of worship, and today it forms one of the leading societies of the denomination in the county."
   

Final disposition:
    unknown, apparently nothing remains to mark the site of the chapel