Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle

The Created Equal Symposium is designed to foster community discussions about race, citizenship, and equality in American society. Marking the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s 1963 March on Washington, the program is centered around four powerful documentary films: “The Abolitionists,” “Slavery by Another Name,” “Freedom Riders” and “The Loving Story.” These films trace the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. The “Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle” initiative was made possible through a grant awarded to the Snowden Library from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

In addition to film screenings and discussions, the symposium includes presentations by noted historians as part of the Organization of American Historians (OAH) Distinguished Lectureship Program, which promotes excellence in the scholarship, teaching, and presentation of American history. All events are free and open to the public.

Sarah Silkey, associate professor of history, and Jessica Oberlin, assistant professor and instructional services librarian, are coordinating the initiatives.

Martin Luther King, Jr.Roundtable discussions

Wednesday, Jan. 21, 7:30 p.m.
Mary L. Welch Honors Hall
Roundtable discussions regarding Martin Luther King’s concept of a “Beloved Community,” exploring what challenges race relations play in our community and how we overcome them.

"The Abolitionists"

Monday, Jan. 26, 8 p.m.
Heim Science Building, Room G-11
Film screening and discussion of “The Abolitionists,” which traces the activism of a diverse group of antislavery reformers.

“The Forgotten Emancipationists” (CANCELLED due to weather)

Monday, Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m. (add to calendar)
Mary L. Welch Honors Hall
“The Forgotten Emancipationists,” a presentation by Manisha Sinha, professor of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

“The Loving Story”

Friday, Feb. 6, 5:30 p.m. (add to calendar)
James V. Brown Library
Film screening and discussion of “The Loving Story,” which examines the Loving family’s Supreme Court challenge to state bans on interracial marriage.

“Slavery by Another Name”

Monday, Feb. 9, 8 p.m. (add to calendar)
Heim Science Building, Room G-11
Film screening and discussion of “Slavery by Another Name,” which examines the abuses of the convict lease system.

“Freedom Riders”

Monday, Feb. 23, 8 p.m. (add to calendar)
Heim Science Building, Room G-09
Saturday, March 7, 7 p.m. 
Community Arts Center
Film screening and discussion of “Freedom Riders,” which follows the efforts of the Freedom Riders to challenge Jim Crow segregation.

“Rethinking Black Power and Black Politics”

Thursday, March 5, 7:30 p.m. (add to calendar)
Mary L. Welch Honors Hall
“Rethinking Black Power and Black Politics,” a presentation by Rhonda Y. Williams, associate professor of history and founding director of the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University.

“Black Woman Reformer: Ida B. Wells and the Struggle Against Racial Oppression”

Friday, March 6, 7 p.m. (add to calendar)
Thomas T. Taber Museum
“Black Woman Reformer: Ida B. Wells and the Struggle against Racial Oppression,” a presentation by Sarah L. Silkey, associate professor of history, Lycoming College.

“Building Safer Schools: The Impact of School Security, Discipline and Prevention on School Crime, Victimization and Disorder”

Thursday, March 26, 4 p.m. (add to calendar)
Mary L. Welch Honors Hall
16th Annual Strauser Lecture: “Building Safer Schools: The Impact of School Security, Discipline and Prevention on School Crime, Victimization and Disorder,” by Allison Ann Payne, associate professor of sociology and criminal justice, Villanova University.

“Whose Memories Matter? Race, Identity, and the Battle for American History”

Wednesday, April 8, 7:30 p.m. (add to calendar)
Mary L. Welch Honors Hall
42nd Annual Robert H. Ewing Lecture: “Whose Memories Matter? Race, Identity, and the Battle for American History,” by Jonathan Scott Holloway, professor of African American Studies and dean of Yale College at Yale University.

“The Loving Story”

Monday, April 20, 8 p.m. (add to calendar)
Heim Science Building, Room G-09
Film screening and discussion of “The Loving Story.”