Kimberlee Josephson

Kimberlee Josephson

Education:

B.S., Bloomsburg University, in Business Administration and Political Science

M.S., LaTrobe University, Australia, in International Policy Studies

M.A., Temple University, in Political Science and International Relations

Ph.D., forthcoming, LaTrobe University, in International Business

Contact Information:

(570) 321-4167
josephson@lycoming.edu

Institute for Management Studies: Visiting Instructor of Business Administration

Business Administration: Visiting Instructor

Kimberlee Josephson joined Lycoming College’s Business department in fall 2013. Prior to joining Lycoming, she served as a full-time faculty member for the Strategic Management department at the Fox School of Business at Temple University. She was the core course coordinator for Temple’s IB program, the faculty mentor for the International Business Association, and the faculty advisor for Fox’s participation in IB case competitions. She has also served as an adjunct professor for Rider University and for Fox's Marketing Department, as well as a guest lecturer for Temple's School of Communications. She has also taught for Lebanon Valley College’s MBA program. Previously she served as a teaching assistant for La Trobe University in Australia where she was active in its Centre for Dialogue and obtained her graduate degree in International Policy Studies. Courses she has taught in the past pertain to Strategy, International Business, Marketing, Trade, Supply Chain Management, Operations Management, Entrepreneurship, and Political Economy.

Prior to her positions in academia, Josephson’s employment experiences ranged from working as a sales assistant in Manhattan for Harry Winston, to a lead producer at a web marketing firm, to serving in on-air promotions for QVC, and working as a freelance researcher for the NGO International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL).

Josephson’s research interests lie in the area of foreign policy, economic development, international management, and multinational institutions. She has found that both empirical and theoretical studies of political systems and structures to be easily transferable to market system analysis due to governing bodies becoming increasingly “instutionalized” taking on an organizational structure similar to that of firms. Furthermore, she seeks to dissect the relationship between foreign policymakers and business officials to further develop a clear understanding of why and how business exerts influence over foreign policy and the context of this relationship in regards to economic development. Her research endeavors include analyzing how economic integration, through trade and investment, correlates with economic development. And she seeks to further the understanding of how “institutionalization” relates to the world community concerning global governance, state development, and sovereignty issues. Her current research undertakings pertain to alternative trade organizations, incentives for FDI, and the impact of innovative forms of economic integration on both consumer markets and regulating bodies.

Josephson enjoys hiking with her husband Erik and their dog Jackson. They also have two donkeys, a potbelly pig, and several chickens.