Professor Estomin receives international recognition for exhibit

Professor Estomin receives international recognition for exhibit

Still from “Fashion to Die For”

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Lynn Estomin, M.F.A., professor of art at Lycoming College, will have two pieces of her exhibit, “SHAME,” featured at the Gallery of Best CSS, an online gallery of innovative websites, and the IndieGo Alley Festival in Aviles, Spain. Her pieces, “A Stitch in Time” and “Fashion to Die For,” both draw attention to the human rights violations in the global textile industry.

“A Stitch in Time,” an online interactive website, tells the stories of various women who worked at the Weldon pajama factory in downtown Williamsport and other areas in Central Pennsylvania.

“Fashion to Die For,” a documentary, focuses on exposing the human rights violations that occur throughout the global textile industry. Estomin’s documentary has also won an Award of Merit at the San Francisco Film Awards; and been featured in the following: New York Audience Now Film Festival, Bucknell University's Samek Art Museum and Downtown Art Gallery; SIGGRAPH’s Enhanced Vision – Digital Video, an international survey of today’s most exciting and innovative digitally-enhanced video art works; the Utah Arts Festival Fear No Film Festival in Salt Lake City, Utah; and in the “Women’s Rights to Dignity, Security and Justice: The Rana Plaza Collapse” and “Triangle Fire: Consequences and Accountability” exhibits at Fordham University School of Law at Lincoln Center, New York, New York.

Estomin teaches graphic design, digital imaging, web design and interactive media at Lycoming College. She creates art about gender, social issues and the environment. Her award-winning documentaries have been screened at international film festivals and broadcast on PBS. Her websites and interactive art have won awards from Adobe, the Webby Awards, Site of the Day and Canadian Web Association. Estomin received her Master of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati, College of Design, Art, Architecture & Planning.

“SHAME,” combines image transfer, an interactive website, video, magazine ads from clothing manufacturers, donated clothing labels, sculpture, silk-screening, stitching and photographs to draw attention to the history of human rights violations in the textile industry.

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