Noted Archaeologist to speak on Latin American Archaeology

Noted Archaeologist to speak on Latin American Archaeology

Early Classic ceramic vessel lid from a royal tomb in El Zotz.

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Lycoming College will host archaeologist, Dr. Nicholas Carter, for two lectures on Maya archaeology, Oct. 20-21. Carter will present “Boxers, Scribes, Kings, and Queens: Bringing Life to the Maya Royal Court” on Monday Oct. 20 from 8:00 – 9:30 p.m., in room G-11 of the Heim building and “One Day, Son, This Will All Be Yours: Managing Royal Succession on the Eve of the Maya Collapse” on Tuesday Oct. 21. 3:00 – 4:30 p.m., in the Academic Center, room C-303. Both events are free and open to the public.

“Boxers, Scribes, Kings, and Queens: Bringing Life to the Maya Royal Court” will focus on the royal palaces of the ancient lowland Maya. Carter will reveal what archaeologists now know about life and death during the theatrical splendor of Maya royal courts, and how those courts grew and declined during the first millennium A.D.

Carter’s second presentation, “One Day, Son, This Will All Be Yours: Managing Royal Succession on the Eve of the Maya Collapse,” will concentrate on how rulers resorted to political and representational innovations to guarantee the positions of their chosen heirs, sometimes even crowning them as junior kings.

Carter is an archaeologist and a specialist in the deciphering of inscriptions and writing systems of the ancient Mayans and other cultures of Mesoamerica. He recently completed his doctorate in anthropology at Brown University, where he teaches. He has been excavating in Guatemala since 2009, and is currently working to set up his own project in Mexico. He also has significant experience in museum work, and has experience with Mayan Epigraphy – the recent decipherment of which presents a great opportunity for significant new research.

Currently, Lycoming College offers its students the opportunity to excavate abroad with two college-supported field schools, the Lycoming College Expedition to Idalion, Cyprus and the Tel Gezer (Israel) Excavation and Publication Project. The college, which hopes to expand the cultural scope of its archaeology program to Latin America, invited Dr. Carter to present some of his work to faculty, students and the public.

Lycoming College is a four-year, residential liberal arts and sciences school dedicated to the undergraduate education of 1,400 students. Its rigorous academic program, vibrant residential community and supportive faculty foster successful student outcomes. Lycoming offers 36 academic majors and is recognized as a Tier 1 institution by U.S. News & World Report. Founded in 1812 and located near the banks of the Susquehanna River in Williamsport, PA., Lycoming is one of the 50 oldest colleges in the nation. For more information, visit www.lycoming.edu

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