Past Grant Recipients

2016 Abstracts

Dr. Elizabeth Moorhouse, Department of Economics

Email: moorhouse@lycoming.edu

Dr. Moorhouse created demonstration videos that students can access online and on demand to enhance the classroom experience in her Principles of Macroeconomics course.

Dr. Holly Bendorf, Department of Chemistry

Email: bendorf@lycoming.edu

Dr. Bendorf created demonstration videos and used Moodle based quizzing so that students could access online and on demand video based resources to better learn the core concepts of Organic Chemistry.

Dr. Rachel Hickoff-Cresko, Department of Education

Email: hickoff@lycoming.edu

Dr. Hickoff-Cresko used the Swivel Robot and an iPad to record presentations and demonstrations of her students work. She then stored and shared the recordings so they are accessible to students to use for reflection and self-critique.

Dr. Sarah Holstein, Department of Psychology

Email: holstein@lycoming.edu

Dr. Holstein used Microsoft Sway and an interactive wiki-based platform in her Drugs, Behavior and Society course. These pages encouraged greater engagement, participation and learning across several sections of the course creating a shared repository for future students to build on.


2015 Abstracts

Heather M. Demshock, Assistant Professor of Accounting

Email: demshock@lycoming.edu

For my Individual Taxation course, I experimented with Doceri for the iPad. My LITT grant supported three goals: 1) to wirelessly present lessons using the screen casting app to enhance ability to move around the classroom and detach myself from the lecture podium, 2) to integrate tax forms and tax research into my lectures in a more cohesive manner, and 3) have the ability to annotate on tax forms/slides and use the whiteboard feature in Doceri.
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Georg Grassmueck, Associate Professor of Business

Email: grassmue@lycoming.edu

I used iPads as e-readers during class to teach students to be more critical readers by using the iPad’s highlighting options to teach students to identify key textual elements. Student learned to accurately identify key points and better connect those to the authors’ arguments, allowing students to more effectively understand and articulate what they’ve learned from the reading.
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Amanda Gunderson, Assistant Professor of Music

Email: kelley@lycoming.edu

I incorporated technology into my introductory psychology class in a variety of ways. I embedded videos into lectures, employed interactive activities online and with iPads, and asked students to utilize simulations, videos, and other exercises on a website connected to their textbook. Students seem to enjoy the interactive and engaging activities as they provide a welcome respite from lecture and allow students to apply information in a more concrete manner. Some unintended outcomes included the cost and computer compatibility issues associated with accessing the textbook-connected site.
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Lauri Kremer, Associate Professor of Accounting

Email: kremer@lycoming.edu

My LITT grant is intended to be used in my ACCT 442 – Corporate Income Tax class. My tools for this grant include use of Doceri and the iPad. My goals for this grant are as follows: 1. Integration of tax forms and tax research into the classroom setting, 2. Project tax forms from the IRS website while demonstrating the complexity of how information from tax forms and schedules flows onto the 1120 & 1120S 3. Enhance movement among the students while they are working during the question and answer period of class.
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Amy Rogers, Associate Professor of Education

Email: rogersa@lycoming.edu

The goal of the project was for students to use iPads to enhance the cultural experience of a travel course to Ireland. Prior to embarking for 10 days in Ireland, students first created a Personal Identity project by creating an iMovie Trailer memoir of their life. Topic outline, storyboards, sound, photos, and video clips were required to help the students familiarize themselves with making an iMovie before we traveled to Ireland. Students also completed IRB proposals on their research topics in order to use the research for future presentations. During our trip to Ireland, the students documented their entire journey using the iPad to research an aspect of Irish culture (family, gender, race, migration, immigration, history, politics, contemporary Ireland). The students also used the iPads to digitally blog each day of their trip. Students gave summaries of assigned readings, tied the readings to personal identity theory, and used google blog to document and share personal reactions and/or make connections on a personal level with sites visited and people met.
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Laura Seddelmeyer, Assistant Professor of History

Email: seddelmeyer@lycoming.edu

My project involves the incorporation of TurningPoint clickers into my Western Civilization survey sections with the purpose of encouraging more student engagement in the course. The technology allows me to create multiple choice map and reading quizzes, include slides within the lecture as another avenue of participation, and incorporate questions that encourage discussion. Because students will register their clickers, the information is collected and used as a grading resource for participation and quizzes. The TurningPoint software also allows me to create games where students can be divided into teams and compete in a Jeopardy! – style review session.
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Sarah Silkey, Associate Professor of History

Email: silkey@lycoming.edu

For my project, I examined techniques for producing online tutorials to teach Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style citation format. Breaking down the components of citation instruction, I determined that effective online instruction would require three separate techniques: a video tutorial to introduce the theory of the Turabian system, traditional lecture capture to review Microsoft Word formatting techniques, and a Moodle quiz to provide citation review practice. By moving citation instruction out of the classroom, I anticipate saving at least two hours of classroom instruction time per class per semester.
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Howard Tran, Associate Professor of Art

Email: tran@lycoming.edu

I will incorporate 3-D printing as one process in my Sculpture I class. Students will learn to create 3-D forms on Invent and Sculpt software and print their designs on a Cube 3-D printer.
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Robin Van Auken, Instructor of Communications, Archaeology

Email: vanauken@lycoming.edu

Going Google: Integrating Google Apps into the College Curriculum. I incorporated free, web-based Google applications into my classes, maintaining my syllabus in Google Documents (word processor), updating my grade book and attendance record in Google Sheets (spreadsheet), and using Google Calendar and Email to coordinate assignment due dates. Students used Google Docs with formal writing assignments, collaborating in real time and using the editing/revision history features to improve writing. Students also used Google Blogs for low-stakes journal writing assignments. I also compared Google Apps with Office 365 for Education (a suite of Microsoft apps).
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2014 Abstracts

Rachel Hickoff-Cresko, Assistant Professor of Education

Email: hickoff@lycoming.edu

I explored various iPad apps, to use as methods for checking for my students’ understanding before, during, and after class time. Students were able to document their thinking by recording and narrating their work using the Explain Everything app and by responding to short answer, multiple choice, and true/false questions using the Socrative app.
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Kimberlee Josephson, Visiting Instructor of Business

Email: josephson@lycoming.edu

For my International Business course I created a video catalog consisting of my own short lectures and other pertinent videos (news clips, examples/demonstrations, documentary snippets, etc.) which students were required to watch before class. I also reorganized the course to allow for class time to be activity-based (rather than lecture-based) in order to foster a dynamic and interactive learning environment.
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Sue Kelley, Associate Professor of Psychology

Email: kelley@lycoming.edu

I incorporated technology into my introductory psychology class in a variety of ways. I embedded videos into lectures, employed interactive activities online and with iPads, and asked students to utilize simulations, videos, and other exercises on a website connected to their textbook. Students seem to enjoy the interactive and engaging activities as they provide a welcome respite from lecture and allow students to apply information in a more concrete manner. Some unintended outcomes included the cost and computer compatibility issues associated with accessing the textbook-connected site.
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Charles Mahler, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Email: mahler@lycoming.edu

My LITT grant supported three small projects: 1) using a Flipped Classroom approach in Chemistry 333 (videos to cover review material); 2) Annotating diagrams used in Chemistry 330, 331W, and 333 with Doceri and putting the annotations on Moodle for student use; and 3) developing new Spartan computational chemistry software assignments for Chemistry 330, 331W and 333.
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Leslie Meeder, Visiting Instructor of Spanish

Email: meeder@lycoming.edu

Amigos de Skype: a Language and Culture Exchange: I developed a video chat partnership between beginning/intermediate Spanish students at Lycoming College and native Spanish students studying English at Colegio La Salle Manresa. After finding a collaborating teacher in Spain, I set up the parameters for weekly individual chats, and together we matched our students. My Moodle course provides resources and guidelines for the students and an interactive forum where each can upload screenshots and summaries of their chats.
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Mary Morrison, Assistant Professor of Biology

Email: morrison@lycoming.edu

For Introductory Biology, I use TurningPoint clickers for brief quizzes in class. My LITT project helped me to learn how to set up student self-registration of their clickers via Moodle and then export participant lists to the TurningPoint software. I also learned how to do automatic scoring within Turning Point, how to aggregate the results across multiple class sessions to calculate an overall clicker quiz average, and how to import and export clicker quiz results between the TurningPoint software and Moodle gradebook so students can see their performance.
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Jeremy Ramsey, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Email: ramsey@lycoming.edu

The project’s goal was to introduce aspects of the flipped classroom through the use of YouTube videos. By recording myself teaching basic types of problems, I now have class time to engage students in a large lecture course with more challenging material and at the same time get instant feedback on student learning through the use of student response device or clickers.
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Chris Reed, Instructor of Mathematics

Email: reed@lycoming.edu

I created short (2-10 minute) videos where I solved exact problems that I assign as homework in my Math 128 course. I uploaded the videos to YouTube and then I linked (and embedded) the videos on my Moodle course page so that the students could view the video solution at the time the homework was assigned.
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Shanna Wheeler, Assistant Director of the ARC

Email: wheelers@lycoming.edu

In my English Composition course, I experimented with the Moodle workshop feature, which facilitates online peer review sessions. In order to determine the most effective use of this feature, I assigned students to fixed peer review groups and monitored their completion of several workshop modules, each with a different structure and feedback mode.
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