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While every effort has been made to make sure this electronic syllabus is error-free, it is not official.
The definitive source of course information remains the original (paper) syllabus distributed in class.


LYCOMING COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 108 FALL 1997

CHEMISTRY 108

FALL 1997 SYLLABUS


Instructors:          Responsibilities:                    Office:  Phone:
Dr. Holly D. Bendorf  Lecture, Recitation, and Laboratory  209 HBC  4365
Mrs. Henriette Evans  Laboratory                           G28 HBC  4180 

Course Schedule:

    Lecture:                 MWF 11:30 - 12:20
    Recitation Sections:     T   7:45 - 8:35 am,  T  1:00 - 1:50 pm
    Prelab and Lab Sections: T   8:45 - 11:35 am, T  2:00 - 4:50 pm

Office Hours: M 2:00 - 3:00 pm, W 10:00 - 11:00 am, R 2:00 - 3:00 pm, and by appointment, or walk-in.

Course Description: CHEM 108 is an introduction to the principles of chemistry, primarily inorganic chemistry. The approach is basically descriptive with examples drawn from the health sciences. Together with CHEM 115 (Brief Organic Chemistry), this course is designed for students who require only 2 semesters of chemistry.

Text and Materials:
"Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry" 5th edition, J. R. Holum, 1994.
Bound laboratory notebook (Freeman).
CHEM 108 lab manual ($2.00 at lab check-in).
Lab deposit ($5.00 at lab check-in, will be returned, minus breakage charges, at check-out).
Safety glasses or goggles (available at College Store).
Calculator with logarithmic and exponential functions (bring to class every day).

Grading Criteria:

                             Quizzes        135 pts   18%
                             Homework        30 pts    4%
                             Exams          300 pts   40%
                             Laboratory     135 pts   18%
                             Final          150 pts   20%

Total points: 750
Letter grades will be assigned as follows: A (675-750), B (600-674), C (525-599), D (450-524), F (523 or below). Keep in mind that +/- grades are included in the ranges shown above.

Homework: Weekly homework assignments are due at the beginning of class each Monday and will be returned in recitation on Tuesday. Each homework assignment is worth 3 points and is evaluated on the basis of the overall quality and completion. Incomplete assignments will not receive full credit and late assignments will not be accepted. Homework keys will be posted outside of the lab every Monday afternoon. They will also be on reserve at the library.

Exams and Quizzes: There will be 10 quizzes and 3 midterm exams. Quizzes are intended to encourage you to stay current with the work and to help you identify "trouble spots" before taking the exams. The lowest quiz grade will be dropped. The exams will be administered in class on September 26, October 17, and November 7. See course outline for quiz dates.

Recitation is your chance to get your questions answered, to review challenging topics, and to work problems with your classmates. We will review the graded homework and go over the material that will be covered on the quiz.

Laboratory: In this portion of the course you will learn laboratory techniques and demonstrate for yourself a number of the concepts we discuss in class. See the lab syllabus for further details.

Study Groups: Study groups will be arranged through the Academic Resource Center (ARC). More information will be given in class.

General Comments:

Attendance is mandatory. Quizzes can not be made-up and will be recorded as a grade of zero. Exams can not be made-up unless the absence has been excused by the Dean's office and I have received notification from that office. A single make-up exam is administered at the end of the semester and covers the entire course. Labs cannot be made-up, except in extreme cases. If you think you may have to miss class, the best policy is to let me know in advance. That way, we can discuss the reasons for the absence, what you will miss that day, and what you may need to make-up. If you cannot reach me at my office, you are welcome to call me at home: 327-2888.

Participation: I encourage you to be as active as possible in class. Do not hesitate to let me know if I am going too fast or have not completely answered your question. I will call on everyone several times during the course of the semester. Bonus points (3 points) will be given for every reasonable answer. If you do not wish to answer a question, you can always pass.

Academic Dishonesty, such as copying the work of another or allowing someone else to copy your work and submit it as their own, whether it be on an exam, quiz, lab report, or homework assignment, will not be tolerated. Penalties for academic dishonesty range from receiving a failing grade on the assignment to dismissal from the college, depending on the nature of the offense. For more information regarding the College policy on academic dishonesty, consult the Pathfinder or Student Handbook

.

Study Suggestions: The material covered in CHEM 108 is of a conceptual and cumulative nature. As a result, you are encouraged to develop study habits which result in a true under-standing of the material rather than mere memorization of facts. A simple rule-of-thumb is to spend 2 to 3 hours studying for each hour spent in class. The following are a few suggestions which may help you make the most out of your study time.

Be prepared for class: Skim the text before coming to lecture. As a result, the lecture will be easier to follow, you'll take better notes, and you'll be better prepared to ask and answer questions. In other words, lecture will be a time of productive and active learning rather than a lesson in taking dictation.

Read actively. Take notes as you read the chapter. This will help keep your attention focused on what you are reading, and these notes make great study/review sheets. As you make your way through the text, stop and attempt the sample problems. Make sure you understand the concepts presented in the text and the relationships expressed in the equations. Summarize these concepts and relationships in your own words. If there are parts of the chapter or problems which are still unclear, make a note of your questions and bring them to class, recitation, or office hours.

Always check your homework assignments, quizzes, and exams against the answer key. Everyone makes mistakes; it's part of the learning process. Learn from the mistakes you have made--take time to go back over any problems you may have gotten wrong. Make every effort to understand where the mistake was made and why.

Don't get behind. This is not a subject where one can successfully cram for an exam. Keep up with the homework and the reading. Occasionally get together with your classmates to quiz each other and review the material. Begin studying several days before an exam. Save the night before the exam for light reviewing and brushing-up on any areas where you feel you need extra practice. Most importantly, get plenty of sleep the night before the exam.

Finally, if you feel that you are having trouble in the course, come see me right away. I am always willing and (almost) always available to help you.

Course Outline:

Every effort will be made to stick to the schedule outlined below. Keep in mind that it is quite possible that we may get ahead or behind the schedule by a day or two. If you have any questions regarding the schedule, please don't hesitate to ask.

Week Dates     Topic                         Q or E      Reading         Problems 
                                                         Assignment      (at end of chapter)

1    25-Aug  course introduction.                        1 Sec. 1, 2, 3  #8, 10, 14, 15, 21, 23
     27-Aug  scientific method, measurement              1 Sec. 4, 5, 6  #33, 35, 43, 48, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59
     29-Aug  measurement, unit conversions               1 Sec. 7, 8     #64, 70, 72, 80, 83, 88

2     1-Sep  states of matter, chemical reactions        2 Sec. 1, 2     #1, 2, 9, 10, 19, 20"
      3-Sep  energy, heat, calories"                     2 Sec. 3, 4"    #32, 33, 42, 45, 47, 54, 59
      5-Sep  changes of state                       Q    2 Sec. 4,       #62, 64, 65, 72, 74, 96

3     8-Sep  atomic and molecular mass                   3 Sec. 2,       #6, 7, 9, 14, 16, 18, 21 (a-d)"
     10-Sep  the mole                                    3 Sec. 1, 2     #22, 28 (a-d), 30 (a-d), 32
     12-Sep  stoichiometry  			    Q    3 Sec. 3, 	 #37, 39, 43, 45, 49

4    15-Sep  molar concentration   			 3 Sec. 4, 5, 6  #53, 63, 65, 69, 73, 75, 79
     17-Sep  atomic theory and electron configuration    4 Sec. 2, 3, 4  #6, 10, 11, 13, 20, 24, 26
     19-Sep  periodic table, bio. important elements Q   4 Sec. 1, 5     #31, 34, 36, 38, 46

5    22-Sep  ions and ionic bonds          		 5 Sec. 1, 2     #2, 6, 9 (a-h), 13, 15, 25, 31, 35
     24-Sep  oxidation and reduction       		10 Sec. 1, 	 Chap. 5: 36, 38, 40, 42; Chap 10: 5
     26-Sep  EXAM 1    				    E              

6    29-Sep  covalent compounds       			 5 Sec. 3,4,5,6  #45, 49, 53, 55 (a-c,g-j), 58 (a-d), 60 (a-d)
      1-Oct  molecular shapes    		    Q    5 Sec. 7, 8     #62, 64, 69, 80, 81, 83, 86
      3-Oct  No classes                    

7     6-Oct  solids and liquids       			 6 Sec. 6,7,8,9  #2, 6, 15, 19, 22, 25, 27, 33, 
      8-Oct  gases: pressure, volume, and temperature    6 Sec. 1, 2, 5  #36, 40, 46, 52, 57, 59, 60, 93"
     10-Oct  ideal gas law, partial pressures" 	   Q     6 Sec. 3, 4     #72, 76, 81, 83, 95, 97

8    13-Oct  mixtures, % concentration"        		 7 Sec. 1, 2, 4  #1, 5, 7, 14,17, 19, 27
     15-Oct  gas solubility      			 7 Sec. 3,       Chap 7: 40, 42, 46, 29, 30, 33; Chap 8: 88
     17-Oct  EXAM 2    				   E              

9    20-Oct  osmosis and dialysis          		 7 Sec. 5, 6    #53, 55, 59, 79
     22-Oct  electrolytes, acids, and bases"        	 8 Sec. 1, 2    #8, 10, 15, 16,18, 23, 30, 35
     24-Oct  conjugate acids & bases, phys. imp. acidsQ  8 Sec. 4,      #65, 68, 70, 72, 74, 76"

10   27-Oct  chemical reactions of acids and bases       8 Sec. 3,      #46, 48, 54, 57, 61
     29-Oct  salts          				 8 Sec. 5,      #82, 86, 87"
     31-Oct  reaction rates and collision theory     Q   9 Sec. 1, 2    #4, 5, 6, 13,17"

11    3-Nov  chemical equilibria, respiration"      	 9 Sec. 3,      #20, 23, 25
      5-Nov  acid-base equilibria, Kw"         		 9 Sec. 4, 	#28, 30, 32, 33"
      7-Nov  EXAM 3    E              

12   10-Nov  pH and pOH          			 9 Sec. 5, 6	#35, 36, 38, 40"
     12-Nov  pH, Ka, and pKa"       			 9 Sec. 6, 7, 8	#46, 48, 54, 58, 62    
     14-Nov  regulation of pH:  buffers    	     Q   9 Sec. 9, 10   #64, 68, 70, 71, 75, 80, 81

13   17-Nov  buffers, acidosis and alkalosis"       	 9 Sec. 10, 11  #82, 84, 86, 90
     19-Nov  atomic radiation, nuclear decay"       	11 Sec. 1,	#2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 14
     21-Nov  half-life				     Q  11 Sec. 1,	#15, 16, 18

14   24-Nov  medical uses: cancer therapy & diagnostics 11 Sec. 4, 6    #47, 61, 62, 88, 89, 91, 92, 94
     26-Nov  No classes                    
     28-Nov  No classes                    

15    1-Dec  units of radiation,effects of overexposure 11 Sec. 2, 3    #35, 37, 43,44, 83
      3-Dec  nuclear power, radiocarbon dating       Q  11 Sec. 5, 7    #19, 20, 23, 24, 31"
      5-Dec  review and catch-up                

Finals Week   The final exam will be administered on the date and time assigned by the
	      registrar.    No Exceptions! 
Lab Syllabus

In the laboratory portion of the course, you will perform a variety of experiments which will illustrate the concepts discussed in class. It is imperative that you come to the lab fully prepared. Careful planning and preparation before you arrive at the lab will allow you to complete your experiments in an efficient and safe manner. Missing or arriving late to prelab will result in a reduced grade and/or dismissal from the lab.

Grading for the laboratory portion of the course is as follows: Lab reports, handed-in at the end of each lab session, are worth 10 points (there are 12). You will also be evaluated on lab safety and hygiene (15 points).

The Laboratory Notebook: A hard-bound notebook must be used. Do not use a spiral notebook or loose-leaf paper. Keep the notebook neat and organized; include an up-to-date table of contents. As you perform the experiment, use your notebook to record your observations, measurements and procedural notes.

Lab Safety: Unsafe behavior in the lab will not be tolerated and violations will be penalized. Repeated violations during a class may result in a zero for that lab. Keep in mind that lab safety includes lab hygiene. In the event that common areas, such as the balances, are left dirty, points may be deducted from the entire lab section. Lab safety and policy will be addressed at the first lab meeting. A few key safety points are outlined below.

Always wear eye protection (goggles) in the lab.
Shorts, short skirts, and open shoes (sandals) are not permitted.
Food, drink, and gum is not permitted and must be left outside of the lab.
Always wash your hands thoroughly upon leaving the lab.

Lab Schedule:

Week     Date      Lab Experiment      
1        26-Aug    Check-in             
2         2-Sep    Measurement         
3         9-Sep    Specific Heat   
4        16-Sep    Separation of a Mixture  
5        23-Sep    "Solutions, Solubility, Electrolytes and Water"         
6        30-Sep    Vitamin C 
7         7-Oct    Copper Cycle   
8        14-Oct    Boyle's Law and Charles' Law  
9        21-Oct    % O2 and CO2 in air and in exhaled air  
10       28-Oct    Atomic Weight of a Metal 
11        4-Nov    Ionic Reactions     
12       11-Nov    9-Bottle Lab   
13       18-Nov    pH Indicators and Buffers     
14       25-Nov    No Lab--Thanksgiving Holiday            
15        2-Dec    Check-out

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    Last updated August 27, 1997.
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