Sociology-Anthropology (SOC, ANTH)

Professor: Ross (Chairperson)
Assistant Professors: Adams, McClain

The Sociology-Anthropology Department offers a major in sociology-anthropology with the requirement to concentrate elective coursework in either anthropology or sociology. Since the sociology-anthropology major involves a core foundation of study in both disciplines, students may not “double concentrate” in sociology and anthropology. Regardless of concentration area, students may minor in human services.

Core courses required of all majors:

ANTH 114, 229, SOC 110, 240, 330, and 430

Concentration Requirements:

  1. Anthropology:
    • ANTH 344, two ANTH electives, and an additional elective appropriate to the student’s sub-field interest. This elective must receive approval from the Department of Sociology-Anthropology, with BIO 338 or 436 (for bioanthropology), ENGL 219 (for linguistic anthropology), a MLS course numbered 221 or above (for cultural anthropology), and REL 226 (for archaeology) being recommended. 

2. Sociology:

    • SOC 344 and three additional departmental electives, two of which must be from SOC 220, 231, 305, 310, 320, 334, or CJCR 300. SOC 222, 325, and 448 may not be counted as electives for the sociology concentration.

The following courses satisfy the cultural diversity requirement: ANTH 114, 229, 230, 232, 234, 310, 320, and 344; SOC 240 and 334.

The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the writing intensive requirement: ANTH 232, 310 and SOC 210, 222, 228, and 330.

Minor

The Department of Sociology-Anthropology offers three minors: Anthropology, Human Services, and Sociology.  

  • A minor in Anthropology requires ANTH 114, 229, and three ANTH electives numbered 200 or above.
  • A minor in Human Services requires either ANTH 229 or SOC 240; SOC 222; SOC 325; SOC 448; and either MATH 123 or MATH 214.
  • A minor in Sociology requires SOC 110 and four SOC electives from SOC 220, 231, 240, 305, 310, 320, 330, 334, 344, and 430. CJCR 300 may be counted as an elective within the Sociology minor.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

114
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
This course serves as an introduction to anthropology, including all four sub-fields of anthropology, which are cultural anthropology, archaeology, biological/physical anthropology, and anthropological linguistics. By looking at human societies holistically and across cultural contexts, anthropology offers a series of tools to address contemporary problems.

229
CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Cultural anthropology seeks to explain the diversity of human societies, while looking for commonalities across them. This course serves as a general introduction to the field of cultural anthropology, including an introduction to the history of anthropological research and the practice of ethnography. Topics include kinship, race, globalization, gender, social status, identity and violence.

230
ANTHROPOLOGY OF LATIN AMERICA
This course examines the history of anthropology in Latin America, from early concerns with Native American populations in Central and South America, to current concerns with cultural plurality, neoliberal economic reforms and environmental conservation. Topics include European colonization, globalization, gender, and medical anthropology. Alternate years.

232
ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Anthropologists have examined the interaction between people and the environment from many different perspectives. This course surveys several of these approaches to understanding human/environment interactions with particular emphasis on human adaptation to the environment across cultures and through time, as well as the current concerns with environmental sustainability and the social context of the environmental movement. Alternate years.

234
ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY
There is a tremendous diversity in how human societies organize themselves for production, distribution and consumption. This course is an examination of the ways people organize themselves around these tasks. The class is both theoretical and practical. Students concerned about real-world business problems re-examine desire, decision-making and the impact of culture on economic behavior, while anthropological theories are considered in terms of their practical utility for understanding observed economic behavior. Topics include the origins of economic systems, ancient economies, colonialism, globalization and international commerce. Alternate years.

310
FOOD AND CULTURE
This course surveys the growing body of scholarship in food studies and the anthropology of food. Food production and consumption are examined in terms of human biology, culture, and social status across time from our evolutionary ancestors to the present day. Topics include systems of food production, the social and cultural context of agricultural settings, the rise of industrial agriculture and fast food, and social movements based in ideas about food, such as the organic and locavore movements. Prerequisite: ANTH 114 or 229, or junior or senior standing. Alternate years.

320
SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Study of selected anthropological problems, theorists, or movements. Sample topics include art and society, ethnography and ethnology, applied anthropology, anthropology of gender, culture and agriculture, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). With departmental consent, this course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ANTH 114 or 229, or junior or senior standing. Alternate years.

344
ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY
This course covers the history of theory in anthropology, with a greater emphasis on theories used within cultural anthropology, although theoretical trends in archaeology, anthropological linguistics and biological/physical anthropology are included to a more limited degree. The course is reading intensive and broad, including work by Franz Boas, Eric Wolf, Clifford Geertz, and Pierre Bourdieu among others. Prerequisite: ANTH 114 or 229, or junior or senior standing. Alternate years.

401
FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY
Participation in an approved archaeological dig or field school program, usually in the Near East or Mediterranean region. Includes instruction in excavation techniques, recording and processing of artifacts. A survey of excavation and research and the use of archaeology as a tool for elucidating historical and cultural changes. Under certain circumstances, participation in an archaeological field school in North, Central, or South America, or elsewhere may be accepted. Special fees apply. May Term or Summer Sessions only. Cross-listed as ANTH 401, and as REL 401 for Mediterranean and Near Eastern digs only. Students desiring credit toward the Religion major or humanities distribution requirement should register for REL 401.

470-479
INTERNSHIP (See index)
Anthropology internship experiences, such as with the Lycoming County Historical Museum, are available.

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(See index) An opportunity to pursue specific interests and topics not usually covered in regular courses. Through a program of readings and tutorials, the student will have the opportunity to pursue these interests and topics in greater depth than is usually possible in a regular course.

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

110
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
An introduction to the problems, concepts, and methods in sociology today, including analysis of stratification, organization of groups and institutions, social movements, and deviants in social structure.

220
SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILY
This course examines American families from a sociological perspective with particular emphasis on the interplay of family as it relates to other social institutions such as the economic, political, educational, religious, and legal institutions. We look at the multiple forms of family and examine racial, ethnic, and social class variations. Additionally, family as a gendered institution and its implications for men’s and women’s lives are addressed.

222
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES
This course is for students interested in learning about, or entering, the human services profession. It reviews the history, the range, and the goals of human services together with a survey of various strategies and approaches to human problems. A twenty-hour community service component is an optional element of the course.

231
SOCIOLOGY OF WAR AND THE MILITARY
Through an emphasis on the American military and American wars of the later 20th and early 21st centuries, this course examines the modern military as a social institution and includes discussion of the origins, nature, experience, social consequences, and future of warfare. The course addresses implications and consequences of having rebuilt the American military following the Vietnam War with an all-volunteer force, including the demographic transformations, the military as employee recruiter, the planned reliance upon reserve forces, the impact on civilian-military relations, and the impact of fighting protracted wars with a volunteer force. Alternate years.

240
RACE, CLASS, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY
A survey course in the sociological field of social inequality. This course explores the explanations and persistence of poverty and inequality. Consideration is given to how dynamics of race, class and gender interact, creating historically specific and enduring patterns of inequality. Among the subjects explored are class, race/ethnicity, gender, intersectionality, power, elites, poverty, social mobility and status attainment. While most of the focus is on the United States, these subjects are also explored within comparative and historical frameworks.

305
SOCIOLOGY OF LAW
This course examines law as a social institution that involves an interactive process: on the one hand, law is created and maintained by human beings, and on the other hand, law provides the structure within which human beings develop values pertaining to justice and injustice. This course examines how law is utilized to address social problems, settle disputes, and exert power over others. Specific attention is given to the legal social control of race, class, and gender. This course addresses how law permeates all facets of life from personal identity to the development of domestic institutions to the governing of international relations. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or junior or senior standing. Alternate years.

310
MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY   
This course examines the social contexts of health, illness and medicine. It gives prominence to the debates and contrasting perspectives that characterize the field of medical sociology. Topics include the social environmental and occupational factors in health and illness, the development of the health professions, ethical issues in medicine, healthcare reform, and the conundrum of managed care. In exploring these topics, emphasis is given to how the socially constructed categories of gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and age relate with physical and mental health, illness, and health care. Prerequisite: SOC 110 is recommended but not required. Sophomore standing or higher. Alternate years.

320
SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
Study of selected sociological and problems, theorists, or movements. Sample topics include sociology of education, environmental sociology, art and society, sociology of childhood, and media and culture. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or junior or senior standing. With departmental consent, this course may be repeated for credit. Alternate years.

325
PROGRAM EVALUATION AND GRANT WRITING
This course introduces a range of basic quantitative and qualitative research methods with emphasis on application of these to the evaluation of social programs. Topics include observational and qualitative methods, survey and interview (structured and unstructured) techniques, using data from records and archives, and data analysis. Students learn about the application of the research process and skills in all phases of assessing a social policy and developing a social program, including needs assessment, implementation analysis, and evaluation of policy or program effectiveness. In addition, a portion of the course covers the process of grant writing in the non-profit arena. The class completes either a community assessment or a program evaluation as well as prepares a grant application for a local non-profit human service organization. Prerequisites: Math 123 and SOC 222. Alternate years.

330
RESEARCH METHODS I
In studying the research process in sociology-anthropology, attention is given to the process of designing and administering both qualitative and quantitative research. Students complete an original field work project in a public setting. Additionally, students learn to compile and analyze quantitative data through a statistical software package. Different methodological skills considered include: field work, survey design, experiments, content analysis, use of secondary data analysis and existing statistics, and qualitative interviews. Prerequisites: SOC 110 and MATH 123.

334
AMERICAN IMMIGRATION
A course on U.S. immigration and assimilation that encompasses America’s multicultural diversity and covers the historical significance of U.S. immigration and the experience of immigrants from 1492 until the present day. Comparisons between when and why groups immigrate as well as their various successes and failures are explored. This course is designed to facilitate an increased understanding of cultural identity, provide a forum to discuss and better understand cultural differences, investigate the mechanisms and consequences of prejudice, oppression, and discrimination on American minority groups, and to explore personal beliefs about human differences. Prerequisite: SOC 110, or junior or senior standing. Alternate years.

344
SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
This course traces the origins of modern social theory beginning with the aftermath of the democratic revolutions in America and France and the capitalist Industrial Revolution in Britain. Analysis of the classical theoretical paradigms of functionalism and conflict theory draws specifically on the works of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Simmel. Contemporary theories include exchange and rational choice theory, symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, phenomenology, feminist theory, critical theory, and post-modernism. Prerequisite: SOC 240. Alternate years.

430
RESEARCH METHODS II
Building on the research skills acquired during a first course in research methodology, students complete an original quantitative or qualitative research project utilizing one of the many data collection strategies available to sociologists and anthropologists such as field work, content analysis, surveys, qualitative interviews, experimental design, secondary data analysis, or program evaluation. Topic selection is of individual student’s choice. Prerequisite: SOC 325, SOC 330, or CJCR 447.

448
PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply a socio-cultural perspective to any of a number of organizational settings in the Williamsport area. As the basis for the course, students arrange an internship in the local community. At the same time the student is contributing time and talent to the organization in question, he/she will also be observing, from a socio-cultural perspective, the events, activities, structure, and dynamics of the organization. These experiences will be supplemented by academic readings, a regularly scheduled seminar, and the keeping of a detailed field journal. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

470-479
INTERNSHIP (See index)
Interns in sociology typically work off campus with social service agencies under the supervision of administrators.

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index)
An opportunity to pursue specific interests and topics not usually covered in regular courses. Through a program of readings and tutorials, the student has the opportunity to pursue these interests and topics in greater depth than is usually possible in a regular course.

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)