Criminal Justice and Criminology (CJCR)

Professor: Ross (Chairperson)
Assistant Professors: Richmond, Hutzell
Part-time Instructors: Martin, Ritter, Robbins, Thompson

The Criminal Justice and Criminology majors are interdisciplinary social science majors. Course work leading to the baccalaureate degree in criminal justice emphasizes critical and in-depth interdisciplinary analysis of the causes of crime, of formal and informal efforts at preventing and controlling crime, and of treatment of the field of criminal justice as an applied social science where students are taught to integrate theory construction with practical application. The Criminal Justice major offers opportunities for internship and practicum experiences in the field, and prepares students for careers in law enforcement, court services, institutional and community-based corrections, treatment and counseling services, and for further education at the graduate level. The Criminal Justice major also prepares students for activist and leadership roles in their communities. Course work leading to the baccalaureate degree in Criminology is designed to critically examine the etiology of crime and to provide strong theoretical and methodological foundations for graduate-level work. Students may not double major in criminal justice and criminology.

Criminal Justice

The major in Criminal Justice consists of 11 courses, distributed as follows:

A. Required Core Courses (seven courses):

  • CJCR 100 — Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • PSY 110 — Introduction to Psychology
  • SOC 110 — Introduction to Sociology
  • PHIL 318 — Philosophical Issues in Criminal Justice
  • CJCR 300 — Criminology
  • CJCR 343 — Research Methods in Criminal Justice
  • CJCR 441 – Crime Prevention and Policy

B. Administration of Justice (select one course):

  • CJCR 201 — Policing and Society
  • CJCR 203 — Correctional Policy
  • CJCR 240 — Community-Based Corrections
  • CJCR 243 — Courts and Sentencing Policy

C. Crime and Delinquency (select one course):

  • CJCR 204 — Youth, Deviance, and Social Control
  • CJCR 242 — Organizational Crime
  • CJCR 345 – Special Topics in Criminal Justice
  • PSCI 342 — Civil Conflict
  • PSCI 362 — Terrorism
  • PSY 116 — Abnormal Psychology
  • PSY 216 — Abnormal Child Psychology
  • PSY 242 — Drugs, Behavior, and Society
  • PSY 310 — Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 410 — Dysfunctional Families and Child Development

D. Legal Studies (select one course):

  • PSCI 231 — Law in America
  • PSCI 242 — Human Rights
  • PSCI 330 — Constitutional Law
  • PSCI 331 — Civil Rights and Liberties
  • PSCI 334 — Legal Research and Writing
  • SOC 305 — Sociology of Law

E. Diverse Communities (select one course):

  • CJCR 334 — Race, Class, Gender, and Crime
  • CJCR 346 — Comparative Criminal Justice
  • SOC 240 — Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
  • SOC 334 — American Immigration

Criminology

The major in Criminology consists of 11 courses, distributed as follows:

A. Required Core Courses (five courses):

  • CJCR 100 — Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • SOC 110 — Introduction to Sociology
  • CJCR 300 — Criminology
  • CJCR 334 — Race, Class, Gender, and Crime
  • CJCR 441 — Crime Prevention and Policy

B. Critical Analysis Electives (select two courses):

  • CJCR 346 — Comparative Criminal Justice
  • PHIL 318 — Philosophical Issues in Criminal Justice
  • SOC 305 — Sociology of Law

C. Research Methodology (two courses):
Select either CJCR 343 Research Methods in Criminal Justice or SOC 330 Research Methods I; and SOC 430 Research Methods II. Although not required, MATH 214 Multivariable Statistics is strongly recommended.

D. Elective Courses (select two courses):

  • CJCR 201 — Policing and Society
  • CJCR 203 — Correctional Policy  
  • CJCR 204 — Youth, Deviance, and Social Control
  • CJCR 240 — Community-Based Corrections
  • CJCR 242 — Organizational Crime
  • CJCR 243 — Courts and Sentencing Policy
  • CJCR 345 — Special Topics
  • ECON 224 — Urban Problems
  • PSCI 231 — Law in America
  • PSCI 242 — Human Rights
  • PSCI 330 — Constitutional Law
  • PSCI 331 — Civil Rights and Liberties
  • PSCI 334 — Legal Research and Writing
  • PSCI 342 — Civil Conflict
  • PSCI 362 — Terrorism
  • PSY 242 — Drugs, Behavior, and Society
  • PSY 310 — Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 410 — Dysfunctional Families and Child Development

Minor in Criminal Justice

A minor in criminal justice consists of five courses: CJCR 100, CJCR 300, and three electives selected from CJCR 201, 203, 204, 240, 242, 243, 334, 341, or 346.

Diversity and Writing Intensive Courses
The following course satisfies the cultural diversity requirement: CJCR 334.
The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count towards the writing intensive requirement: CJCR 300, and PHIL 318.

100
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
This course explores the role of law enforcement, courts and corrections in the administration of justice; the development of police, courts and corrections; the scope and nature of crime in America; introduction to the studies, literature and research in criminal justice; basic criminological theories; and careers in criminal justice.

147
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE FORENSICS
This course is an exploration of the history and application of forensic sciences that provides a wide overview of the many subfields within this discipline. Specifically, this course provides the student with an understanding of key definitions, theoretical frameworks, and forensic science’s role within the contemporary law enforcement environment. In addition, the course addresses the impact that this developing field has had on society as a whole. Prerequisite: CJCR100.

201
POLICING AND SOCIETY
Who are the police and what is policing? Exploration of these questions provides a context for critical inquiry of contemporary law enforcement in the United States. Attention is given to law enforcement purposes and strategies, the work force and work environment, and why sworn officers do what they do. Emphasis is also placed on being policed and policing the police. Treatment of these issues enables exploration of basic and applied questions about the projection of state power in community relations, including those related to homeland security. Prerequisite: CJCR 100.

203
CORRECTIONAL POLICY
This course presents an overview of offenders, punishment, correctional ideologies, and societal reaction to crime. The historical and philosophical development of the correctional system is examined. The primary emphasis is on critical analysis of contemporary correctional programming for adult and juvenile offenders in the United States. Other social issues and structures directly related to corrections are explored. Prerequisite: CJCR 100.  

204
YOUTH, DEVIANCE, AND SOCIAL CONTROL
This course is designed to provide the student with a general understanding of juvenile deviance and state processes intended to interrupt youth deviance and juvenile delinquency, particularly in the juvenile justice system. Students explore historical perspectives, deviant juvenile subculture, underlying philosophies, the formal processes and organization of juvenile justice systems, promising prevention/treatment approaches and juvenile probation practices. Students are asked to think critically and offer solutions or strategies to a range of dilemmas confronting the juvenile justice system, including the transfer of juveniles to adult status and the movement to privatize juvenile justice services. Prerequisite: CJCR 100.

240
COMMUNITY-BASED CORRECTIONS
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of community-based correction programs, with emphasis on the role of probation and parole and their impact on the offender, the criminal justice system, and society. Particular attention is given to advancements in technologies used to monitor and track offenders within the community, prison overcrowding, re-entry programs, officer discretion and ethics, and the role of specialized treatment courts. Prerequisite: CJCR 100.

242
ORGANIZATIONAL CRIME
Three major areas of organizational crimes are covered, including traditional organized crime, crimes of the corporate world, and crimes committed under auspices of the government. Examples of topics include international organized crime cabals, drug trafficking and money laundering by the CIA, political bribe taking, government brutality and physical/economic coercion, civil rights violations, and crimes situated in the manufacturing, pharmaceutical, and service trades. Prerequisite: CJCR 100.

243
COURTS AND SENTENCING POLICY
This course examines the role of municipal, state, and federal courts in the American criminal justice system. Many important steps in the processing of criminal cases involve the courts or courtroom actors, including arrest, booking, charging, arraignment, trial, sentencing, and appeal. This course considers the responsibilities and constraints of the courts and courtroom actors in each of these steps. The ideal American criminal court is a site where society’s desire for punishment is tempered by its obligation to protect the rights of those accused of crime. This course examines the historical evolution of this ideal and considers the degree to which modern American courts have been able to achieve it. Additional topics that may be considered include the use of courts to affect change in other components of the criminal justice system (e.g., police, prisons) and the emerging trend of “specialized” courts (e.g., drug courts). Prerequisite: CJCR 100, alternate years.

300
CRIMINOLOGY
Analysis of the sociology of law; conditions under which criminal laws develop; etiology of crime; epidemiology of crime, including explanation of statistical distribution of criminal behavior in terms of time, space, and social location. Prerequisite: CJCR 100 or SOC 110.

334
RACE, CLASS, GENDER, AND CRIME
This course provides a theoretical and practical exploration of the link between gender, race, class and criminal justice practices. First, this class focuses on the link between masculinity and violent behavior, exploring factors influencing aggressive behavior among men. Second, a portion of the class focuses on women in the criminal justice system, exploring the nature and extent of criminal offending among women, including interactions of women as offenders and workers within the criminal justice system. Finally, this course utilizes a critical stance while exploring aspect of race and class pertaining to victimology, criminology, and justice processing. Prerequisites: CJCR 100 and 300.

343
RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Students learn social science methods, research design and implementation, and evaluation of contemporary research in criminal justice. Topics covered include the logic of causal order, sampling theory, qualitative and quantitative design, data collection, proper analysis of data, and basic statistical selection and calculation. Emphasis is placed on understanding social science research and on communicating research in writing. Prerequisites: CJCR 100. Prerequisite or corequisite: CJCR 300 and statistics.  Prerequisite or corequisite: CJCR 300.

345
SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
This is a seminar for advanced students offered in response to student request and faculty interest. This course may be repeated for additional credit with approval of the criminal justice coordinator, but only when course content differs. Sample topics include the death penalty, hate crimes, civil liability in criminal justice, justice in the media, environmental crime, etc. Prerequisite: CJCR 100 and one other CJCR course.

346
COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE
National criminal justice systems are rooted in each country's particular legal system and traditions.  After reviewing the major legal systems, this course examines criminal justice systems representative of each legal system. The elements of criminal justice systems (policing, prosecution, the judiciary, and corrections) are compared across several countries, but with special emphasis placed on comparisons to the United States. Prerequisites: CJCR 100 and one other CJCR course.

441
CRIME PREVENTION
Crime prevention measures may reduce crime through altering offenders' motivations to commit crime or restricting offenders' opportunities to commit crime. Evaluations of crime prevention policies and programs are reviewed to determine what works, what does not, and why. In addition to the criminal justice system's ability to prevent crime, the impact of families, schools, communities, and broader economic and social policies on offending is critically examined. Prerequisites: CJCR 300 and either CJCR 343 or SOC 330.

448-449
CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM
Students are placed with criminal justice agencies, providing opportunities to apply classroom knowledge in an organizational setting, encouraging development of professional skills, helping students identify and clarify career interests, and providing opportunities to conduct hands-on field research. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and successful completion of the CJCR Department’s practicum application.

470
INTERNSHIP (See index)

N80
INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index)
This course represents an opportunity to pursue specific interests and topics not usually covered in regular courses. Through a program of readings and tutorials, the student has the opportunity to pursue these interests and topics in greater depth than is usually possible in a regular course. Prerequisite: CJCR 100 and consent of criminal justice coordinator.

N90
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)