Lycoming College Academic Program

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM

Lycoming College awards two different degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.). For students wishing to do so, multiple degrees are possible. Candidates for multiple degrees must satisfy all requirements for each degree and earn a minimum of 40 units (160 semester hours). Students who have completed fewer than 40 units but more than 32 units (128 semester hours), and who have completed all other requirements for two baccalaureate degrees from Lycoming College will receive only one baccalaureate degree. They must choose the degree to be conferred. Completed majors will be posted to the transcript.

Freshmen entering the College during the 2014-2015 academic year are subject to the requirements which appear on the following pages. Continuing students are subject to the Catalog in effect at the time of their entry unless they elect to complete the current curriculum. Students who transfer to the College with advanced standing will be subject to the requirements imposed upon other students at the College who have attained the same academic level.

Students already possessing a baccalaureate degree who are returning for a second degree will be reviewed on an individual basis by the Registrar and major department. Post-baccalaureate students will be subject to the current catalog, must complete all major requirements and related prerequisites, and may be required to complete the distribution requirements. This does not apply to non-degree students in certificate-only programs.

Students must complete the final 32 semester hours of the degree program at Lycoming College. At least 16 semester hours in the major program must be taken at Lycoming.

If a student interrupts his or her education but returns to the College after no more than one academic year has passed, he/she will retain the same requirements in effect at the initial date of entrance. A student who withdraws from the College for more than one year will, upon return, be required to complete the requirements currently imposed upon other students of the same academic level.

Lycoming College certifies five official graduation dates per calendar year. Diplomas are awarded when all materials confirming the completion of the graduation requirements have been received and approved by the Registrar's Office at least five days prior to the date of graduation. Degrees are awarded at the following times: January 1 for those who complete requirements between September 1 and the end of the Fall semester; May Commencement date for those who complete requirements between January 1 and the end of the Spring semester; May term for those who complete requirements during May term; Summer I for those who complete requirements during Summer I; Summer II for those who complete requirements during Summer II.

Lycoming's Commencement ceremony occurs in May. Students will be permitted to participate in the ceremony when (a) they have finished all degree requirements as of the preceding January 1, have finished all requirements as of the May date, or have a plan approved by the Registrar for finishing during May term or the Summer sessions; and (b) they are in good academic standing at the conclusion of their last semester prior to the ceremony.

The College will graduate any student who has completed the distribution program, fulfilled the requirements for one major, earned a minimum of 32 units (128 semester hours) and met all other requirements for graduation.

Exceptions to or waivers of any requirements and/or policies listed in this Catalog must be made by the Committee on Academic Standards.

THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

Lycoming College is committed to the principle that a liberal arts education is the ideal foundation for an informed and productive life. The liberal arts — including the fine arts, the humanities, mathematics, the natural and social sciences — have created the social, political, economic and intellectual systems which help define contemporary existence. Therefore, it is essential that students grasp the modes of inquiry and knowledge associated with these disciplines.

Consequently, the Baccalaureate degree (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) is conferred upon the student who has completed an educational program incorporating the two principles of the liberal arts known as distribution and concentration. The objective of the distribution principle is to insure that the student achieves breadth in learning through the study of the major dimensions of human inquiry: the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. The objective of the concentration principle is to provide depth of learning through completion of a program of study in a given discipline or subject area known as the major. The effect of both principles is to impart knowledge, inspire inquiry, and encourage creative thought.

THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE

Requirements for Graduation

Every B.A. degree candidate is expected to meet the following requirements in order to qualify

for graduation:

  • Complete the distribution program.
  • Complete the Writing Across the Curriculum Program requirements.
  • Complete one year of Physical Activities, Wellness, or Community Service. Military Science 101, 201, 301, or 401 may satisfy this requirement.
  • Complete a major consisting of at least eight unit courses (32 semester hours). Students must pass every course required for the major and have a minimum major grade point average of 2.00.
  • Pass a minimum of 32 units (128 semester hours) with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00. Additional credits beyond 128 semester hours may be completed provided that the minimum 2.00 cumulative average is maintained.
  • Complete in residence the final eight courses (32 semester hours) offered for the degree at Lycoming.
  • Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at the College.
  • Complete the Intent to Graduate Form and file the form in the Registrar’s Office during the final semester before graduation.

THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE

The Bachelor of Science degree is available to students majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Psychology. Students may elect either the B.A. or the B.S. degree in these majors. The B.S. degree is appropriate for students planning further education in a graduate or professional school.

Requirements For Graduation

Every B.S. degree candidate is expected to meet the following requirements in order to qualify for graduation:

  • Complete the B.S. major in either Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Psychology. Students must pass every course required for the major and have a minimum major grade point average of 2.00.
  • Complete the distribution program.
  • Complete the Writing Across the Curriculum Program requirements.
  • Complete one year of Physical Activities Wellness, or Community Service. Military Science 101, 201, 301 or 401 may satisfy this requirement. 
  • Pass a minimum of 32 units (128 semester hours) with a minimum grade point average of 2.00. Additional credits beyond 128 semester hours may be completed provided that the minimum 2.00 cumulative average is maintained.
  • Complete in residence the final eight courses (32 semester hours) offered for the degree at Lycoming.
  • Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at the College.
  • Complete the Intent to Graduate Form and file the form in the Registrar’s Office during the  final semester before graduation.

THE DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM

The Distribution Program for the B.A. and B.S. Degrees

A course can be used to satisfy only one distribution requirement (except in the Cultural Diversity area). Courses for which a grade of “P” is recorded may not be used toward the fulfillment of the distribution requirements. (For an explanation refer to the Grading System.) No more than two courses used to satisfy the distribution requirements may be selected from the same department, except for ENGL 106 or 107 and Modern Language courses numbered below 222. This means that in English, Modern Languages literatures, and Theatre care must be taken to comply with this rule.

A course in any of the following distribution requirements refers to a full-unit course (four semester hours) taken at Lycoming, any appropriate combination of fractional unit courses taken at Lycoming which accumulate to four semester hours, any appropriate course which is taken by cross-registration, any appropriate course which is part of an approved off-campus program (such as those listed in the catalog sections titled COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS, SPECIAL ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES, and STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS), or any approved course transferred from another institution.

Special distribution requirements which apply to students in the Lycoming Scholar Program appear under the Honors Program. For information regarding CLEP and AP credit, see Alternative Credit Sources.

A. English - Students are required to pass ENGL 106 or 107 during their freshman year.

B. Fine Arts - Students are required to pass two courses (or the equivalent) from Art, Creative Writing, Digital Media Communication, Film, Literature, Music, and/or Theatre.

C. Modern and Ancient Language Studies – Students are required to pass a course in French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, or Spanish numbered 101, unless exempted on the basis of placement, and a course numbered above 101 in the same language. Placement in a modern language at the appropriate course level will be determined by the faculty of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. Placement in an ancient language at the appropriate course level will be determined by the Department of Religion.

D. Humanities
- Students are required to pass four courses from History, Literature (English, Modern Languages and THEA 335), Philosophy, and/or Religion. At least one course must be successfully completed in 3 of the 4 disciplines.

E. Mathematics
- Students are required to demonstrate competence in basic algebra and to pass one course selected from MATH 106, 109, 112, 115, 123, 128, 129, 130, 214, or 216. The requirement of competence in basic algebra must be met before the end of the fourth semester or within one year of entry, whichever is later. Students that have not met this competency requirement before the final semester of the applicable time period must register for MATH 100 in that semester.

New students take the mathematics placement examination determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences at a new-student orientation session. Those who do not pass this exam may take home a computerized study guide and take another exam at a specified time.

After beginning classes at Lycoming College, a student may satisfy the basic algebra competence requirement by successful completion of MATH 100 at Lycoming, or of an approved course transferred from another college, or by passing a competence examination administered by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. Enrolled students may take this examination only once during a semester and may be subject to a testing fee. No student will be permitted to take this examination while enrolled in MATH 100.

F. Natural Sciences -Students are required to pass two laboratory courses chosen from Astronomy/Physics, Biology, and/or Chemistry.

G. Social Sciences
- Students are required to pass two courses from Archaeology, Criminal Justice and Criminology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology-Anthropology.

H. Cultural Diversity
- Students are required to pass one designated course which introduces students to Cultural Diversity which are distinct from the predominant Anglo-American culture.  The course selected to fulfill this requirement may also be used to satisfy one of the other general education requirements in the liberal arts. Students also may fulfill the cultural diversity requirement by successfully completing at least one full-time semester (12 semester hours) in a college-accepted study abroad program.

The following courses have been approved to be offered as cultural diversity courses and will be offered as such. Students must check semester class schedules to determine which courses are offered as “D” (cultural diversity) courses for that semester.

ANTHROPOLOGY                                        ANTH 114, 229, 230, 232, 234, 310, 320, 344
ART                                                                ART 222, 339
BUSINESS                                                     BUS 244, 319
CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                      CJCR 334
EDUCATION                                                 ECED 243, EDUC 338, SPED 243, 338
ENGLISH                                                       ENGL 229, 332, 334
FRENCH                                                        FRN 221, 222, 311
GERMAN                                                       GERM 221, 222
HISTORY                                                       HIST 120, 140, 230, 232, 238, 240, 246, 325, 338, 342
MUSIC                                                           MUS 116, 128, 234, 238
POLITICAL SCIENCE                                    PSCI 140, 241, 331, 367
PSYCHOLOGY                                              PSY 341
RELIGION                                                     REL 110, 210, 211, 212, 225, 226, 320, 323 328, 333
SOCIOLOGY                                                 SOC 240, 334
SPANISH                                                       SPAN 221, 222, 311
THEATRE                                                      THEA 114, 212, 332, 333, 335, 410
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES          WGST 200, 300

Writing Across the Curriculum Program

I. Purpose

The Lycoming College Writing Across the Curriculum Program has been developed in response to the conviction that writing skills promote intellectual growth and are a hallmark of the educated person. The program has therefore been designed to achieve two major, interrelated objectives:

1) to enhance student learning in general and subject mastery in particular, and
2) to develop students’ abilities to communicate clearly. 

In this program, students are given opportunities to write in a variety of contexts and in a substantial number of courses in which they receive faculty guidance and reinforcement.

II. Program Requirements

Students must successfully complete the following writing requirements:

1) ENGL 106 (Composition) or ENGL 107 (Honors Composition)
2) A writing component in all distribution courses completed at Lycoming
3) Three courses designated as writing intensive, or “W” courses.

The following policies apply:

• Successful completion of ENGL 106 or 107 is a prerequisite for enrollment in writing-intensives.
• All courses designated “W” are numbered 200 or above.
• One of the student’s “W” courses must be in his/her major (or one of the majors) or with  departmental approval from a related department.
   All three cannot carry the same course-number prefix (e.g. PHIL, ENGL, ACCT, etc.).

Physical Activities, Wellness, and Community Service Program

I. Purpose

This program is designed to promote students’ physical welfare, health awareness, and to encourage a sense of civic responsibility.

II. Program Requirements

Students must pass any combination of two semesters of zero credit course work selected from the following:

1. Designated physical activities courses,
2. Designated varsity athletics,
3. Designated wellness courses,
4. Designated community service projects,
5. Designated military science courses.

Research and Information Competencies

The need to support and instruct students on how to evaluate, access and understand the information-based environment that surrounds them is critical. A distinguished liberal arts education relies on a breadth of competencies as well as the ability to access knowledge. At Lycoming College, students are encouraged to formulate and refine questions; to acquire basic knowledge of where to begin the discovery process; to know how, when and what kind of information defines effective research; to synthesize, format, cite and reconcile diverse information; to evaluate the quality and sustainability of information; and to differentiate between types of literary sources and the relevance of each.

CONCENTRATION

The Major

Students are required to complete a series of courses in one departmental or interdisciplinary (established or individual) major. Specific course requirements for each major offered by the College are listed in the curriculum section of this catalog. Students must earn a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade point average in the major. Students must declare a major by the beginning of their junior year. Departmental and established interdisciplinary majors are declared in the Office of the Registrar, whereas individual interdisciplinary majors must be approved by the Committee on Curriculum Development. Students may complete more than one major, each of which will be recorded on the transcript. Students may be removed from major status if they are not making satisfactory progress in their major. This action is taken by the Dean of the College upon the recommendation of the department, coordinating committee (for established interdisciplinary majors), or Curriculum Development Committee (for individual interdisciplinary majors). The decision of the Dean of the College may be appealed to the Committee on Academic Standards by the student involved or by the recommending department or committee. Students pursuing majors in two different degrees are subject to the policy for dual degrees listed under the Academic Program.

Departmental Majors — The following Departmental majors are available:

Bachelor of Arts Degree:

Accounting
Art History
Art Studio
Astronomy
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Corporate Communication
Criminal Justice
Criminology
Digital Media Communication
Economics
English
French
German
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Sociology-Anthropology
Spanish
Theatre

Bachelor of Science Degree:

Astrophysics
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Psychology

Established Interdisciplinary Majors — The following established Bachelor of Arts degree interdisciplinary majors include course work in two or more departments:

Actuarial Mathematics
American Studies
Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean
International Studies
Literature

Individual Interdisciplinary Majors — Students may design majors which are unique to their needs and objectives and which combine course work in more than one department. These majors are developed in consultation with students' faculty advisors and with a panel of faculty members from each of the sponsoring departments. The applications are acted upon by the Curriculum Development Committee. The major normally consists of at least 10 courses, at least six of which are at the 300 or 400 level. No more than two courses used to satisfy distribution requirements may be included in the major. Examples of individual interdisciplinary majors are:  Legal Studies, Women and the Legal System, and Religion and Marketing. Applications are available in the Office of the Registrar.

The Minor

The College awards two kinds of minors, departmental and interdisciplinary, in recognition of concentrated course work in an area other than the student’s major. All minors are subject to the following limitations:

• A minor must include at least two unit courses which are not counted in the student’s major.
• A student may receive at most two minors.
• Students with two majors may receive only one minor; students with three majors may not receive a minor.
• Students may not receive a minor in their major discipline unless their major discipline is Actuarial Mathematics and the minor is Mathematics (three courses must be taken outside of the major); their major is Art and the minor is Art History; their major is Art and the minor is Web Design and Technologies; their major is Biology and the minor is Environmental Science; their major is Corporate Communication and the minor is Digital Media Communication, Film Studies, or Media Writing; their major is Digital Media Communication and their minor is Film Studies or Media Writing; or their major is Religion and the minor is Biblical Languages.

A discipline is any course of study in which a student can major. Tracks within majors are not separate disciplines.

• A student may not receive a minor unless his/her average in the courses which count for his/her minor is a minimum of 2.00.

• Courses taken P/F may not be counted toward a minor. Students must declare their intention to minor by completing a form
   available in the Office of the Registrar.

When students complete a minor, the title will be indicated on their official transcript.

Minor requirements must be completed at the time of graduation.

Departmental Minors — Requirements for a departmental minor vary from department to department. Students interested in pursuing a departmental minor should consult that department for its policy regarding minors.

Departmental minors are available in the following areas:

ACCOUNTING
ART
Art History
Commercial Design
Painting
Photography
Sculpture
ASTRONOMY
BIOLOGY
Biology
Environmental Science
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
CHEMISTRY
COMMUNICATION
Digital Media Communication
Film Studies
Media Writing
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
ECONOMICS
General
Quantitative
ENGLISH
Literature
Writing
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
French
German
Spanish
HISTORY
American History
European History
History
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES
Computational
Computer Science
Mathematics
MUSIC
PHILOSOPHY
Philosophy
Philosophy and Law
Philosophy and Science
Ethics
PHYSICS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political Science
American Politics
World Politics
Legal Studies
PSYCHOLOGY
RELIGION
SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY
THEATRE
Performance
Technical Theatre
Theatre History and Literature

Interdisciplinary Minors — Interdisciplinary minors include course work in two or more departments. Students interested in interdisciplinary minors should consult the faculty  coordinator of that minor. Interdisciplinary minors are available in the following areas:

AMERICAN STUDIES
ARCHAEOLOGY AND CULTURE OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST AND MEDITERRANEAN
BIBLICAL LANGUAGES
CLASSICAL STUDIES
Environmental Sustainability
FINANCIAL ECONOMICS AND ANALYSIS
HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION
MEDIEVAL STUDIES
MULTICULTURALISM
PUBLIC POLICY- DOMESTIC PUBLIC POLICY, INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC POLICY
WEB DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGIES
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS (also see “Pre-Professional Advising” in The Advising Program section) Preparation for Educational Professions — Lycoming College believes that the liberal arts provide the best preparation for future teachers. Thus, all education students complete a liberal arts major in addition to the Lycoming College Teacher Education Certificate requirements. Students can be certified in early childhood, secondary (biology, chemistry, citizenship, English, general science, mathematics, physics, social sciences, social studies), K-12 (art, modern languages, music), and dual certification special education.

 All teacher education programs are approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Pennsylvania certificates are recognized in most other states either through reciprocal agreements or by transcript evaluation. For more detailed information, see the Education Department listing.

Preparation for Health Professions — The program of pre-professional education for the health professions (allopathic, dental, osteopathic, podiatric and veterinary medicine; optometry, and pharmacy) is organized around a sound foundation in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics and a wide range of subject matter from the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. At least three years of undergraduate study is recommended before entry into a professional school; the normal procedure is to complete the Bachelor of Arts degree.

Students interested in one of the health professions or in an allied health career should make their intentions known to the Admissions Office when applying and to the Health Professions Advisory Committee (HPAC), Dr. Edward Gabriel, Chair, during their first semester (see Pre-Professional Advising).

Preparation for Legal Professions — Lycoming offers a strong preparation for students interested in law as a profession. Admission to law school is not predicated upon a particular major or area of study; rather, a student is encouraged to design a course of study (traditional or interdisciplinary major) which is of personal interest and significance. While no specific major is recommended, there are certain skills of particular relevance to the pre-law student: clear writing, analytical thinking, and reading comprehension. These skills should be developed during the undergraduate years.

Pre-law students should register with the Legal Professions Advisory Committee (LPAC), Dr. John Whelan, Chair, during their first semester (see Pre-Professional Advising).

Preparation for Theological Professions — Students preparing to attend a theological seminary should examine the suggestions set down by the Association of Theological Schools. It is recommended that students pursue a broad program in the liberal arts with a major in one of the humanities (English, history, languages, literature, philosophy, religion) or one of the social sciences (American studies, criminal justice, economics, international studies, political science, psychology, sociology-anthropology). Students preparing for a career in religious education should major in religion and elect five or six courses in psychology, education and sociology. This program of study will qualify students to work as educational assistants or directors of religious education after graduate study in a theological seminary.

Students should register with Theological Pursuits and Callings (TPAC), Dr. Steven Johnson, Chair, during their first semester. TPAC acts as a “center” for students, faculty, and clergy to discuss the needs of students who want to prepare themselves for the ministry, religious education, advanced training in religion, or related vocations (see Pre-Professional Advising).

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS

Lycoming has developed several cooperative programs to provide students with opportunities to extend their knowledge, abilities, and talents in selected areas through access to the specialized academic programs and facilities of other colleges, universities, academies and hospitals. Although thorough advising and curricular planning are provided for each of the cooperative programs, admission to Lycoming and registration in the program of choice do not guarantee admission to the cooperating institution. The prerogative of admitting students to the cooperative aspect of the program rests with the cooperating institution. Students who are interested in a cooperative program should contact the coordinator during the first week of the first semester of their enrollment at Lycoming. This is necessary to plan their course programs in a manner that will ensure completion of required courses according to the schedule stipulated for the program. All cooperative programs require special coordination of course scheduling at Lycoming.

Engineering Physics – This program is intended for students who are interested in pursuing careers in engineering. The program consists of two options.

Option 1: The 3/2 Pre-engineering Program

Option 1 is a 3/2 program partnership between Lycoming College and the Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at the State University of New York at Binghamton (SUNY Binghamton). The student will spend three years at Lycoming College taking the necessary distribution, physics, mathematics, and other engineering-oriented courses. Following his/her third year, the student will then transfer to the Watson School of Engineering and complete engineering courses in either Electrical Engineering or in Industrial and Systems Engineering. At the completion of the 3/2 program, the student will have earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics with an Engineering Physics Concentration and either a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering or a Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering.

Note that for Option 1, a strict adherence to the curriculum guides is essential in order for a student to be able to complete the program in five years.

Option 2: The Physics Major with an Engineering Physics Concentration

Option 2 is a four-year degree at Lycoming College where the student majors physics with a concentration in Engineering Physics. The concentration in engineering physics consists of courses in physics, mathematics, and computer science. The Engineering Physics concentration provides and emphasis on skills useful to students seeking a career in applied physics or engineering. The student can choose to pursue either a BA or BS degree in physics.

Forestry or Environmental Studies — Lycoming College offers a cooperative program with Duke University in environmental management and forestry. Qualified students can earn the baccalaureate and master degrees in five years, spending three years at Lycoming and two years at Duke. All Lycoming distribution and major requirements must be completed by the end of the junior year. At the end of the first year at Duke, a baccalaureate degree will be awarded by Lycoming. Duke will award the professional degree of Master of Forestry or Master of Environmental Management to qualified candidates at the end of the second year.

The major program emphases at Duke are Forest Resource Management, Resource Economics and Policy, and Resource Ecology.

The program is flexible enough, however, to accommodate a variety of individual designs. An undergraduate major in one of the natural sciences, social sciences, or business may provide good preparation for the programs at Duke, but a student with any undergraduate concentration will be considered for admission. All students need at least two courses each in biology, mathematics, and economics.

Students begin the program at Duke in July after their junior year at Lycoming with a one-month session of field work in natural resource management. They must complete a total of 48 units which generally takes four semesters.

Some students prefer to complete the baccalaureate degree before undertaking graduate study at Duke. The master degree requirements for these students are the same as for those students entering after the junior year, but the 48-unit requirement may be reduced for completed relevant undergraduate work of satisfactory quality. All credit reductions are determined individually and consider the students' educational background and objectives. Faculty advisor: Dr. Melvin Zimmerman.

 Medical Technology - Students desiring a career in medical technology may either complete a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science program followed by a clinical internship at any hospital accredited by the American Medical Association, or they may complete the cooperative program. Students electing the cooperative program normally study for three years at Lycoming, during which time they complete 24 unit courses, including the College distribution requirements, a major, and requirements of the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). The current requirements of the NAACLS are: four courses in chemistry (one of which must be either organic or biochemistry); four courses in biology (including courses in microbiology and immunology), and one course in mathematics.

Students in the cooperative program usually major in biology, following a modified major of six unit courses that exempts them from Ecology (BIO 224) and Plant Sciences (BIO 225). Students must take either Microbiology (BIO 321) or Microbiology for the Health Sciences (BIO 226), and either Human Physiology (BIO 323) or Cell Biology (BIO 435). The cooperative program requires successful completion of a one-year internship at a hospital accredited by the American

Medical Association. Lycoming is affiliated with the following accredited hospitals: Williamsport, Robert Packer, Lancaster, Graduate, and Abington. Students in the cooperative program receive credit at Lycoming for each of eight courses in biology and chemistry successfully completed during the clinical internship. Successful completion of the Registry Examination is not considered a graduation requirement at Lycoming College.

Students entering a clinical internship for one year after graduation from Lycoming must complete all of the requirements of the cooperative program, but are not eligible for the biology major exemptions indicated above. Upon graduation, such students may apply for admission to a clinical program at any hospital.

Optometry — Through the Accelerated Optometry Education Curriculum Program, students interested in a career in optometry may qualify for admission to the Pennsylvania College of Optometry after only three years at Lycoming College.

After four years at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, a student will earn a Doctor of Optometry degree. Selection of candidates for the professional segment of the program is completed by the admissions committee of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry during the student’s third year at Lycoming. (This is one of two routes that students may choose. Any student, of course, may follow the regular application procedures for admission to the Pennsylvania College of Optometry or another college of optometry to matriculate following completion of his or her baccalaureate program.) During the three years at Lycoming College, the student will complete 24 unit courses, including all distribution requirements, and will prepare for his or her professional training by obtaining a solid foundation in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. During the first year of study at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, the student will take 39 semester hours of basic science courses in addition to introductions to optometry and health care. Successful completion of the first year of professional training will complete the course requirements for the B.A. degree at Lycoming College.

Most students will find it convenient to major in biology in order to satisfy the requirements of Lycoming College and the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. Such students are allowed to complete a modified biology major which will exempt them from two biology courses: Ecology (BIO 224) and Plant Sciences (BIO 225). (This modified major requires the successful completion of the initial year at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry.) Students desiring other majors must coordinate their plans with the Health Professions Advisory Committee in order to ensure that they have satisfied all requirements. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Edward Gabriel.

Podiatry — Students interested in podiatry may either seek admission to a college of podiatric medicine upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree or through the Accelerated Podiatric Medical Education Curriculum Program (APMEC). The latter program provides an opportunity for students to qualify for admission to the Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine (PCPM) or the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (OCPM) after three years of study at Lycoming. At Lycoming, students in the APMEC program must successfully complete 24 unit courses, including the distribution requirements and a basic foundation in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. During the first year of study at PCPM or OCPM, students must successfully complete a program of basic science courses and an introduction to podiatry. Successful completion of the first year of professional training will contribute toward the fulfillment of the course requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree at Lycoming.

Students in the cooperative program who major in biology will be allowed to complete a modified major which will exempt them from two biology courses: Ecology (BIO 224) and Plant Sciences (BIO 225). This modified major requires the successful completion of the initial year at PCPM or OCPM.

Students interested in a career in podiatric medicine should indicate their intentions to the Health Professions Advisory Committee. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Edward Gabriel.

U.S. Army Reserve Officers Training Corps Program (R.O.T.C.) — The program provides an opportunity for Lycoming students to enroll in the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). Lycoming notes enrollment in and successful completion of the program on student transcripts. Military Science is a four-year program divided into a basic course given during the freshman and sophomore years and an advanced course given during the junior and senior years. The Army ROTC Basic Course comprises four courses and requires no commitment to the military.  The Army ROTC Advanced Course comprises four courses and requires a military commitment.  The content and methods of the Advanced Course comprise the minimum curriculum that an individual must complete in order to be commissioned.

The U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program is offered to Lycoming College students in cooperation with Bucknell University. For more information, call 570-577-1013 or visit http://www.bucknell.edu/ROTC.xml.

THE HONORS PROGRAM

The Scholar Program

The Lycoming College Scholar Program is a special program designed to meet the needs and aspirations of highly motivated students of superior intellectual ability. Lycoming Scholars satisfy the College’s distribution requirements with more challenging courses than students not in the Scholar Program are required to complete. (Substitutions to the Scholar Distribution Requirements can be made only by successful application to the Scholar’s Council.) Lycoming Scholars also participate in special interdisciplinary seminars and in an independent study culminating in a senior presentation. Scholars may audit a fifth course each semester at no additional cost. In addition, Scholars may be exempted from the usual limitations on independent studies by the Individual Studies Committee.

Students are admitted to the program by invitation of the Scholar Council, the group which oversees the program. The council consists of a director and four other faculty selected by the Dean of the College, and four students elected by current scholars. The guidelines governing selection of new scholars are flexible; academic excellence, intellectual curiosity, and creativity are all taken into account. Students who desire to participate in the Scholar Program but are not invited may petition the Scholar Council for consideration. Petitioning students should provide the Scholar Council with letters of recommendation from Lycoming faculty and a transcript to be sent to the director of the Scholar Program.

To remain in the program, students must maintain a cumulative average of 3.00 or better. Students who drop below this average will be placed on Scholar probation for one semester. After one semester, they will be asked to leave the program if their GPA has not returned to 3.00 or higher. To graduate as a Scholar, a student must have at least a 3.00 cumulative average. Scholars must successfully complete five Lycoming Scholars Seminars, as well as the non-credit Senior Scholar Seminar in which they present the results of their required independent study project.  In addition, the following distribution requirements must be met.

Scholar Distribution Requirements for Students in B.A. and B.S. Programs

A. English — Scholars must complete ENGL 106 or ENGL 107 (by invitation only). The Scholar Council strongly recommends that qualified scholars enroll in ENGL 107 if scheduling permits. ENGL 106 or 107 must be taken during the freshman year.

B. Fine Arts — Scholars are required to pass two courses (or the equivalent) from the following: Art: ART 111, 116, 220 or higher; Music: MUS 117, 128, 160 or higher; Theatre: Any course except 135-138, 145, 148, and 149. NOTE: Scholars must earn a course grade of A- or better in THEA 100; Creative Writing: ENGL 240, 322, 341, 342, 411, 412, 441 or 442; Literature: Any English Literature course (except ENGL 215) and the literature courses of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures (French, German, or Spanish).

C. Modern and Ancient Language Studies — Scholars are required to pass a course in French, German, or Spanish numbered 111 or higher, or a course in Greek, Hebrew or Latin numbered 221 or higher. Placement in a modern language at the appropriate course level will be determined by the faculty of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. Placement in an ancient language at the appropriate course level will be determined by the Dept. of Religion. Scholars who have completed two or more years of a given language in high school are not admitted for credit to the elementary course in the same modern language except by written permission of the chairman of the department.

D. Humanities — Scholars are required to pass four courses from three of the following disciplines: History: any course numbered 200 or higher; Literature: any English literature course (except ENGL 215) and the literature courses of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures (French, German, or Spanish); Philosophy: any course numbered 219 or higher; Religion: any course numbered 200 or higher.

E. Mathematics
— Scholars must earn at least a grade of B (3.00) in one of MATH 106, 109, 112, 115, or 123; or successfully complete one of MATH 128, 129, 130, 214 or 216.

F. Natural Sciences — Scholars are required to pass two laboratory courses from the following: Astronomy/Physics: any course numbered 111 or higher; Biology: any course numbered 110 or higher; Chemistry: any course numbered 110 or higher.

G. Social Sciences
— Scholars are required to pass two courses from the following: Archaeology: any course numbered 200 or higher, except 348/448, 402; Criminal Justice and Criminology: any course numbered 200 or higher, except 230, 340, 448/449; Economics: any course numbered 110 or higher; Political Science: any course numbered 110 or higher*; Psychology: PSY 110 or any other PSY course numbered 200 or higher; Sociology-Anthropology: any course numbered 200 or higher, except SOC 448.

*NOTE: Scholars must earn a course grade of B or better in 100 level PSCI courses.

H. Cultural Diversity — Scholars are required to pass one designated course which introduces students to Cultural Diversity which is distinct from the dominant western culture. Approaches to study may be artistic, historical, sociological, anthropological, international, psychological, or issues oriented. The course selected to fulfill this requirement may also be used to satisfy one of the other general education requirements in the liberal arts.

I. Writing Across the Curriculum — This requirement is the same as that stipulated by the College for all students.

J. Physical Activities, Wellness and Community Service — This requirement is the same as that stipulated by the College for all students.

K. Lycoming Scholar Seminars — Team-taught interdisciplinary seminars are held every semester under the direction of the Lycoming Scholar Council. They meet for one hour each week (Tuesdays at noon) and carry one hour of credit. Grades are “A/F” and are based on students’ performance. Lycoming Scholars are required to successfully complete five seminars and they are permitted to register for as many as eight. Topics for each academic year will be selected by the Scholar Council and announced before spring registration of the previous year.

Students must be accepted into the Scholar Program before they enroll in a Scholar Seminar. Scholars are strongly urged to register for a least one seminar during the freshman year.

L. Senior Project — In their junior or senior year, scholars must successfully complete an independent studies or departmental honors project which has been approved in advance by the Independent Studies Committee and the Scholar Council. This project must be presented orally as part of the Senior Scholar Seminar and be accepted by the Scholar Council.

M. Major — Scholars must complete a major and 32 units (128 semester hours), exclusive of the Senior Scholar Seminar.

Note to Transfer Students — In the case of transfer students and those who seek to enter the program after their freshman year and in other cases deemed by the Scholar Council to involve special or extraordinary circumstances, the Council shall make adjustments to the scholar distribution requirements provided that in all cases such exceptions and adjustments would still satisfy the regular College distribution requirements.

Management Scholars Program of the Institute for Management Studies

The IMS sponsors a Management Scholars Program for academically talented students in the three IMS departments. To join the Management Scholars Program, a student must satisfy the following criteria:

a) Have a declared major or minor in one or more of the IMS departments. However, the IMS Director may invite or permit other students to join the Management Scholars Program who do not meet this criteria, such as freshmen who have not yet declared a major or minor.

b) Have an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher, or exhibit strong academic potential if the student is a first-semester freshman.

To graduate as a Management Scholar, a student must meet the following criteria:

a) Successfully complete two semester-hours of Management Scholar Seminars.

b) Successfully complete a major or minor in one of the three IMS departments.

c) Graduate with a GPA of 3.25 or higher in both overall college work, and within an IMS major and/or minor.

d) Successfully complete an appropriate internship, practicum or independent study, or complete a special project approved by the IMS Director.

At least one Management Scholar Seminar is taught per academic year on an interdisciplinary topic of relevance to students in all three IMS departments. The seminars are offered as one semester-hour courses and do not result in overload charges for full-time students.

Students who are currently Lycoming College Scholars may also become Management Scholars and participate in both programs.

Departmental Honors

Honors projects are normally undertaken only in a student’s major, and are available only to exceptionally well-qualified students who have a solid background in the area of the project and are capable of considerable self-direction and have a GPA of at least 3.00. The prerequisites for registration in an honors program are as follows:

  • A faculty member from the department(s) in which the honors project is to be undertaken must agree to be the director and must secure departmental approval of the project.
  • The director, in consultation with the student, must convene a committee consisting of two faculty members from the department in which the project is to be undertaken, one of whom is the director of the project, and one faculty member from each of two other departments related to the subject matter of the study.
  • The Honors Committee must then certify by their signatures on the application that the project in question is academically legitimate and worthy of pursuit as an honors project, and that the student in question is qualified to pursue the project.
  • The project must be approved by the Committee on Individual Studies.

Students successfully complete honors projects by satisfying the following conditions in accordance with guidelines established by the Committee on Individual Studies:

  • The student must produce a substantial research paper, critical study, or creative project. If the end product is a creative project, a critical paper analyzing the techniques and principles employed and the nature of the achievement represented in the project shall be also submitted.
  • The student must successfully explain and defend the work in a final oral examination given by the honors committee.
  • The Honors Committee must certify that the student has successfully defended the project, and that the student’s achievement is clearly superior to that which would ordinarily be required to earn a grade of “A” in a regular independent studies course.
  • The Committee on Individual Studies must certify that the student has satisfied all of the conditions mentioned above.

Except in unusual circumstances, honors projects are expected to involve independent study in two consecutive unit courses. Successful completion of the honors project will cause the designation of honors in that department to be placed upon the permanent record. Acceptable theses are deposited in the College library. In the event that the study is not completed successfully or is not deemed worthy of honors, the student shall be reregistered in independent studies and given a final grade for the course.

THE ADVISING PROGRAM

Academic Advising

One advantage of a small college is the direct, personal contact between a student and the College faculty who care about that student’s personal, academic, and professional aspirations. The student can draw upon their years of experience to resolve questions about social adjustment, workload, study skills, tutoring, and more. Perhaps the member of the faculty with the most impact on a student is the academic advisor.

The freshman advisor, whom the student meets at summer orientation, assists with course selection by providing accurate information about requirements, programs, and career options. Advisors help students to identify other campus resources, such as counseling and Health Services, Career Development, Campus Activities, and more.

During the sophomore year, the student must choose a major and select an advisor from the major department. The new advisor, while serving as a resource, can best advise that student about course selection and graduate school and career opportunities.

Advisors at Lycoming endeavor to contribute to students’ development in yet another way. They insist that students assume full responsibility for their decisions and academic progress. By doing so, they help to prepare them for the harder choices and responsibilities of the professional world.

Also, Lycoming provides special advising programs for careers in medicine, law, and religion. Interested students should register with the appropriate advisory committee immediately after deciding to enter one of these professions.

Pre-Professional Advising

(also see “Pre-Professional Programs” in the Concentration section)

Preparation for Educational Professions —Students interested in obtaining teacher certification should consult with a member of the Education Department as early as possible. See the Education Department listing.

Preparation for Health Professions — Students interested in one of the health professions or in an allied health career should make their intentions know to the Admissions Office when applying and to the Health Professions Advisory Committee (HPAC) during their first semester. This committee advises students concerning preparation for and application to health-professions schools. All pre-health professions students are invited to join the student Pre-Health Professions Association. Also see descriptions of the cooperative programs in podiatric medicine, optometry, and medical technology.

Preparation for Legal Professions — Students interested in pre-law should register with the Legal Professions Advisory Committee (LPAC) during their first semester and should join the Pre-Law Society on campus. LPAC assists the pre-law student through advising, compilation of recommendations, and dissemination of information and materials about law and the legal profession. The Pre-Law Society sponsors films, speakers, and field trips including visits to law school campuses.

Preparation for Theological Professions — Students who plan to investigate the religious vocations should register with Theological Pursuits and Callings (TPAC)during their first semester. TPAC acts as a “center” for students, faculty, and clergy to discuss the needs of students who want to prepare themselves for the ministry, religious education, advanced training in religion, or related vocations. Also, it may help coordinate internships for students who desire practical experience in the parish ministry or related areas.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES

Academic Resource Center (ARC)
Daniel Hartsock, Director
Shanna Wheeler, Assistant Director
www.lycoming.edu/arc

The Academic Resource Center, located on the third floor of the Snowden Library, provides a variety of free services to the campus community.

Tutoring in Writing — Working one-on-one, Writing Consultants use questioning techniques to help writers improve papers while developing confidence and independence as writers. Writing Consultants discuss development, organization, grammar, documentation, and any other writing concern. Writing Consultants offer more than 35 hours of scheduled tutoring weekly.

Tutoring in the Content Areas—The ARC offers one-on-one tutoring support in most courses. Tutors assist students with homework assignments and test preparation. A list of tutors is available on the ARC website or by contacting the ARC directly.

Study Groups — Conducted for selected classes, study groups offer students an opportunity to draw on the experiences of a successful upper class student to navigate the academic challenges of courses.  Study group facilitators attend class and organize review and study sessions outside of class.

Study Skills Support—The ARC provides support through individualized instruction and through small group workshops upon request. Topics vary depending on the needs of students. Also, the ARC offers a more formal option for study skills support: ARC 100, Success Skills Workshop.

ARC 100, Success Skills Workshop

A seven-week course, the workshop introduces students to a variety of topics important to student success. Among these are time management, learning styles, motivation, highlighting text, and note-taking. Topics will be selected to meet students’ needs. ARC 100 is highly recommended for students who, in consultation with their academic advisors, choose to improve their academic skills. This non-credit course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

Disability Support—The Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities assists students in arranging for classroom accommodations, meeting requirements, and developing appropriate study practices.

Office of the Assistant Dean for Freshmen

Lycoming College believes a student’s freshman year needs structure and support. This office serves as a focal point for the freshman and his or her family.

Freshman Orientation — The purpose of this required program is to acquaint new students and their families more fully with the College so that they can begin their Lycoming experience under the most favorable circumstances. Students sit for placement tests, confer with their academic advisors, preregister for fall classes, and become acquainted with their classmates.

1st Weekend — Begins the day freshmen arrive with New Student Convocation. The weekend activities include academic success, career and library workshops along with social events.

Information and Support — Students and their families find the Office of the Assistant Dean for Freshmen an accessible resource to resolving problems, developing solutions, coordinating services and enabling student success. Student and family newsletters are provided during the year.

Office of the Assistant Dean for Sophomores

The College continues to provide academic counseling and support as students move into the sophomore year. The Assistant Dean for Sophomores meets individually with upperclassmen and, in cooperation with the Assistant Dean for Freshmen, conducts small group retreats and other meetings. These efforts are designed to alert students to their circumstances, to help them explore options, to motivate them to achieve their academic aspirations, and to provide them with useful strategies and resources for success.

In addition, the Sophomore Dean consults with students on a variety of personal, social, residential, financial, and other concerns.

Early Assessment

During the sixth week of the semester classroom instructors prepare Early Assessment Progress Reports for freshmen, new transfer students, students on academic probation, and students with cumulative GPAs less than 2.10. In week seven, academic advisors, students, parents, deans, and coaches receive these progress reports and can counsel students having difficulty regarding adjustment strategies. Progress grades are not recorded on the student’s permanent record.

SPECIAL ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES

First-Year Seminar — Every fall, Lycoming College offers a number of first-year seminars, small classes that investigate topics in various disciplines. Students receive a letter from the Director of the First Year Seminar in the spring before their freshman year telling them what seminars will be available.

May Term — This four-week voluntary session is designed to provide students with courses listed in the catalog and experimental and special courses that are not normally available during the fall and spring semesters and summer sessions. Some courses are offered on campus, others involve travel. In addition to the courses themselves, attractions include less formal classes and reduced tuition rates. On campus courses have included Field Geology, Energy Economics, Writer’s Seminar, American Detective Fiction, and The American Hard-Boiled Mystery. Travel courses have included Painting at the Outer Banks, Art History and Photography, Cross-Cultural Psychology, and Tropical Marine Biology in Jamaica. Students may take a maximum of 4 semester hours.

Summer Sessions I and II — These two successive five-week academic terms offer the opportunity for students to complete internships, independent studies and semester courses. Students may take a maximum of 8 semester hours.

Independent Studies — Independent studies are available to any qualified student who wishes to engage in and receive academic credit for any academically legitimate course of study for which he or she could not otherwise receive credit. It may be pursued at any level (introductory, intermediate, or advanced) and in any department, whether or not the student is a major in that department. An independent studies project may either duplicate a catalogue course or be completely different from any catalog course. In order for a student to be registered in any independent study course, the following conditions must be satisfied:

1) An appropriate member of the faculty must agree to supervise the project and must certify by signing the application form that the project involves an amount of legitimate academic work appropriate for the amount of academic credit requested and that the student in question is qualified to pursue the project.

2) The studies project must be approved by the chair of the department in which the studies project is to be undertaken. In the case of catalog courses, all department members must approve offering the catalog course as an independent studies course.

3) After the project is approved by the instructor and the chair of the appropriate department, the studies project must be approved by the Committee on Individual Studies.

Participation in independent studies projects which do not duplicate catalog courses is subject to the following:

• Students undertaking independent studies projects must have a GPA of at least 2.50.

• Students may not engage in more than one independent studies project during any given semester.

• Students may not engage in more than two independent studies projects during their academic careers at Lycoming College.

• The Individual Studies Committee may exempt members of the Lycoming College Scholar Program from these two limitations.

As with other academic policies, any other exceptions to these two rules must be approved by the Committee on Academic Standards.

Internship Program — An internship is a course jointly sponsored by the College and a public or private agency or subdivision of the College in which a student is able to earn college credit by participating in some active capacity as an assistant, aide, or apprentice.

For a one unit (4 semester hour) internship, at least ten hours per week must be spent in agency duties. Academic requirements include a daily log or journal, a research paper of approximately ten pages or its equivalent, and a reading list of approximately five books or the equivalent. The student and academic supervisor meet weekly during the term of the internship.

The objectives of the internship program are:

1) to further the development of a central core of values, awarenesses, strategies, skills, and information through experiences outside the classroom or other campus situations, and

2) to facilitate the integration of theory and practice by encouraging students to relate their on-campus academic experiences more directly to society in general and to possible career and other post-baccalaureate objectives in particular.

Any junior or senior student in good academic standing may petition the Committee on Individual Studies for approval to serve as an intern. A maximum of 16 credits can be earned through internships, practica, and/or student teaching. Guidelines for program development, assignment of tasks and academic requirements, such as exams, papers, reports, grades, etc., are established in consultation with a faculty director at Lycoming and an agency supervisor at the
place of internship.

Students with diverse majors have participated in a wide variety of internships, including ones with NBC Television in New York City, the Allenwood Federal Prison Camp, Pennsylvania State Department of Environmental Resources, Lycoming County Historical Society, the American Cancer Society, business and accounting firms, law offices, hospitals, social service agencies, banks and Congressional offices.

Practica — Practica are offered in Accounting, Art, Biology, Business, Communication, Criminal Justice, Economics, Education, IMS, Psychology, and Sociology. These courses require 10 to 12 hours of work per week in a business, agency, or organization in addition to classroom time. A maximum of 16 credits can be earned through practica, internships, and/or student teaching.

Teacher Intern Program — The purpose of the Teacher Intern Program is to provide individuals who have completed a baccalaureate degree with the opportunity to become certified teachers through on-the-job training. Interns can earn a Lycoming College Teacher Education Certificate and be certified by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in elementary, secondary (biology, chemistry, citizenship, English, general science, mathematics, physics, social sciences, social studies), K-12 (art, modern languages, music), and special education (cognitive, behavior and physical/health disabilities).

Interested individuals should file a formal application with the Education Department for admission to the Intern Program. Upon completion of the application process, interns receive a letter of Intern Candidacy from the Pennsylvania Department of Education which the candidate then uses to apply for a teaching position. Necessary professional coursework can be completed prior to the teaching experience when individuals obtain teaching position. See Education Department listing for more information.

The Philadelphia Center — A full semester liberal arts program for professional development and field study is available to Lycoming students. The program is open to juniors majoring in any discipline or program. The Philadelphia Center is sponsored and administered by the Great Lakes Colleges Association.

Washington Semester — With the consent of the Department of Political Science and the Registrar, selected students are permitted to study in Washington, D.C., at The American University for one semester. They may choose from seven different programs: Washington Semester, Urban Semester, Foreign Policy Semester, International Development Semester, Economic Policy Semester, Science and Technology Semester, or American Studies Semester.

United Nations Semester — With the consent of either the Department of History or Political Science and the Registrar, selected students may enroll at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey, in the United Nations Semester, which is designed to provide a first-hand acquaintance with the world organization. Students with special interests in world history, international relations, law, and politics are eligible to participate.

Capitol Semester Internship Program — This program is available to eligible students on a competitive basis. The program is cosponsored by Pennsylvania’s Office of Administration and Department of Education. Paid internships are available to students in most majors. Interested students should contact the Career Services for additional information.

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

Students are encouraged to participate in a variety of study abroad programs sponsored by affiliates or other institutions. Students who intend to study abroad must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Study abroad opportunities range from summer sessions to a full semester or academic year overseas. All overseas programs require prior approval from the students’ major departments, the Director of International Education, the Dean of Students and the Registrar. Applications may be obtained from the Director of International Education.

A limited number of competitive grants for study abroad at our affiliate institutions are available. Application forms are posted on the College’s home page under Academic Programs, Study Abroad. For more details, contact the Director of International Education.  Lycoming aid transfers only to the Westminster Business School and Otto-Friedrich-Universität.

Affiliate Programs – Lycoming has cooperative arrangements with five institutions overseas: CUEF Université-Stendhal Grenoble 3 (Grenoble, France), Estudio Sampere (Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Spain), the Otto-Friedrich-Universität (Bamberg, Germany), Regent’s American College (London, England), and the Westminister Business School, University of Westminster (London, England).  Course offerings vary at each institution; contact the Director of International Education for details.  Students interested in programs in Costa Rica, Ecuador, France, Germany and Spain should also contact the Department of Modern Language Studies.

Programs Sponsored by Other Institutions

Lycoming students have taken advantage of opportunities offered by other institutions in countries such as Cyprus, Egypt, Ireland, Israel, Italy, and Turkey. Information regarding these and other programs is available through the Director of International Education and Career Services. 

NOTE: Lycoming College cannot assume responsibility for the health, safety, or welfare of students engaged in or en route to or from any off-campus studies or activities which are not under its exclusive jurisdiction.