Point guard Jerald Williams ’13 loves dishing out assists, something he has done at a record-pace
throughout his career at Lycoming College. Perhaps it’s no surprise then that he’s assisted a U.S.
Congressman and the International Trade Commission as a summer intern.
His coach has called Williams the team’s engine, driving the Warriors to 55 wins, an NCAA Division
III tournament appearance and two Commonwealth Conference championship games during his first three
seasons with the program.
It’s not where Williams may have thought he’d end up. He was recruited by several Division I schools
before a knee injury kept him from playing the summer before his junior year of high school and several
schools lost interest. Lycoming didn’t.
“In your mind, you have a vision of how you want to play and a style in which you want to do it,” Coach
Guy Rancourt said. “It was like a hand and a glove with Jerald. It was a perfect fit. It really put us in a
position to take off. He is a special young man and that’s why he has started every game since he arrived and
accomplished everything he’s done.”
Williams has shattered records typically reserved for a player nearing the end of his senior campaign. He
entered his final year at Lamade Gym with school marks of 560 assists and 242 steals and was less than 100
assists and 65 steals from the top 25 in NCAA Division III history.
His skills on the court are recognized by nearly everyone who watches him. He was the Commonwealth
Conference Rookie of the Year in 2010 and earned all-conference honors as a junior.
In August, he went with Rancourt’s East Coast All Stars, a team with players from Duke, Stanford, Iowa
and Xavier, to Estonia for three games against national teams.
As the players tried on their uniforms and walked around before their first practice together on
Lycoming’s campus, Duke’s Quinn Cook, who grew up playing with Williams on the D.C. Assault AAU
team, walked up next to him and said, “This guy here, he’s my man.”
After all, Williams’ on-court numbers are eye-popping. His 21-assist game against Mount Aloysius in
2011 was the 19
th
-most in NCAA history. With Williams at the point, the Warriors have led the league in
scoring and turnover margin twice during his career, and he’s finished in the top 10 in Division III in assists
twice and steals three times.
“I’ve been shocked,” Williams said of his records. “That is what hard work gets you. Coming off the
knee injury, everybody had given up on me. Getting to come to Lycoming and set all those records has just
been a good experience. It felt good having everybody cheer for me because I did something that will be
remembered forever.”
The criminal justice major’s continued education off the court, though, may be even more impressive.
Thanks to a connection from a cousin and some help on his resumé at Lycoming, he spent the summer after
his freshman year on Capitol Hill, working for U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who was a member of the
Civil Rights movement.
“Coming into Lycoming, I wanted to be a business major, but I changed my mind when I was working on
Capitol Hill,” said Williams, who plans to become a juvenile probation officer. “I got into politics, so that led
me to the criminal justice major.”
After his junior year, Williams went back to the nation’s capital, this time working for the International
Trade Commission, doing human resources and building management work.
“Jerald has a desire to be the best in everything he’s doing,” Rancourt said. “To his credit, he went out
there and hustled and found himself opportunities in the summer. We certainly do all we can to put our
players in position to be successful with internships in the summer, but Jerald was someone who wasn’t
waiting around. He wasn’t asking for help. He’s a driven young man.”
The Warriors’ engine hopes that drive lands the team back in the NCAA tournament.
“The goal is to win the MAC championship,” Williams said. “We’ve been there two out of the three years
I’ve been here. I want to go out on top.”
Jerald Williams ’13
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