Recent graduate offers
career-building workshops
By Maranda Poe ’14
Kristin Guthrie ’10 returned to
Lycoming College this semester as an
intern in the career services office.
Guthrie, who earned a bachelor’s
degree in psychology, is pursuing a
master’s degree in education in counseling
and student affairs at Bloomsburg
University.
She schedules classroom presentations
and discussions with students on topics
such as career services, resumé writing
skills, cover letters and graduate school
applications. She also hosts a resumé
review session each Wednesday night.
“What attracted me to Lycoming
College as an undergraduate was the small,
intimate campus setting where students
are able to interact with faculty and staff at
an individual level,” Guthrie said. “When
I was asked to determine a placement for
my internship requirement, I knew that
Lycoming College was where I would like
to intern, mostly for the same reasons. The
small, private college setting would allow
me to interact with many professionals
within the student affairs field and gain
exposure not only to career services and
counseling, but also the other divisions
within the college and to see how they
interact with one another.”
Guthrie has also volunteered at
Bloomsburg’s Career Development
Center. “My interest in career services has
evolved out of an interest in both student
development and career development,”
she said.
Guthrie is running a program
designed for freshmen and sophomores
that focuses on career planning. The
program consists of four workshops
where students will explore different
career options through self-assessment
in the hopes of finding a career best
suited to their personal values, interests
and skills. Open workshops are offered
once a week for all students that focus on
resume and cover letter building skills.
Finally, Guthrie is helping to plan and
organize “Life After Lyco,” a street fair
for graduating seniors to learn about the
transition from college to either work or
graduate school.
“My goal while I am at Lycoming is to
be able to reach out to as many students
as possible and make them aware of the
valuable resources that the College has to
offer them,” she said.
Neuroscience minor added
A new interdisciplinary minor in
neuroscience will be offered in fall 2013.
The minor is designed for students in
any major who are interested in theory
and research on the mind, brain and
nervous system. Two required courses,
neurobiology and biological psychology,
provide students with an interdisciplinary
approach to the fundamental structure
and function of the brain that includes
laboratory experiences across the breadth
of current neuroscience research.
The two core courses train students
to access, read and critically analyze
primary neuroscience literature, develop
hypotheses, design and carry out
experiments, analyze data, present the
results and engage in discussion of ethical
issues related to neuroscience research.
The four elective courses allow
students to explore interdisciplinary
developments in biology, chemistry,
computer science, mathematics, philosophy,
physics, psychology and sociology that
enrich and extend the understanding of the
brain and of human thought and behavior.
“This was spurred by a confluence
of faculty working together in similar
areas,” said Dr. Mary Morrison, assistant
professor of biology. “The minor brings
together faculty from psychology, biology,
philosophy and sociology. This is the
ultimate embrace of the liberal arts ideal.”
Dr. Rebecca Gilbertson, assistant
professor of psychology, stressed that
this interdisciplinary approach is unique
in that the philosophy department is
included.
“We’re creating the interface to
encourage the students,” Gilbertson said.
“We’re rewarding students by giving them
a more concrete experience.”
Morrison said that students with a
minor in neuroscience will be better
prepared for graduate and medical
school, teaching, as well as conducting
neuroscience, clinical psychology and
behavioral research.
Kristin Guthrie ’10, an intern in the College’s career services office, assists Mitchell Shirk ’16 during a
resumé workshop.
Drs. Mary Morrison (left), biology, and Rebecca
Gilbertson, psychology, helped develop a new neuro-
science minor.
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