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THY

ARTS CENTER

COLLABORATION

INCREASES ACCESS

Lycoming College will have

expanded access to downtown

Williamsport’s Community

Arts Center (CAC) as the

result of an agreement

reached with the CAC and

the Pennsylvania College of

Technology. Lycoming may

now use the historic 2,100-seat

venue (the restored former

Capitol Theatre) to present

performing arts, such as band

and choral performances,

recitals, musicals and music

galas, speakers and film series,

as well as for academic and

community outreach events.

In addition, the CAC may

provide internship or job-

shadowing opportunities for

Lycoming students pursuing

careers in performing arts

administration, and students

may participate in master

classes offered by CAC

performers.

TRUSTEE LEIGH T.

HOWE PRESENTS ON

CURRENT HEALTHCARE

ISSUES

Lycoming College trustee

and alumna Leigh T. Howe ’78,

former executive vice president

and principal of Windsor

Healthcare Equities, delivered

a lecture titled, “Taking Care

of our Future... Investing in

Quality Healthcare,” which

covered current health care

issues and considerations

for successful financial

performance in the sector. Her

presentation was sponsored

by the College’s Institute

for Management Studies as

part of its James W. Harding

Executive Speaker Series.

Howe is an investment and

finance professional with more

than 30 years of experience

working with private equity

and commercial banks to

evaluate the credit risk and

returns of real estate projects

in the senior housing and

healthcare markets. She holds

a master’s degree in business

administration/finance from

Loyola University Maryland

and a bachelor’s degree in

economics and business

administration from Lycoming

College.

DOUTHAT LECTURE

SERIES: ANCIENT MAYA

HIGHLANDS

As part of the James and

Emily Douthat Lectureship in

the Liberal Arts and Sciences,

Barbara Arroyo, Ph.D.,

discussed the results of recent

archaeological excavations

in highland Guatemala in

her presentation, “Learning

about the Ancient Maya

Highlands: Recent Research

at Naranjo and Kaminaljuyu,

Guatemala.” The talk focused

on the development of these

regional centers as important

Mesoamerican cities during

the pre-Hispanic period.

Archaeological research

during the last decade

has uncovered important

information about the earliest

settlers of the Maya highlands

at the sites of Naranjo and

Kaminaljuyu, and Arroyo

detailed the regional

interactions of these two cities

— one of which, Kaminaljuyu,

is mostly buried by modern

Guatemala City. Arroyo

is the coordinator for the

Kaminaljuyu Archaeological

Zone at the Dirección General

de Patrimonio Cultural y

Natural in Guatemala.

Community Arts Center

Leigh T. Howe ’78

Barbara Arroyo, Ph.D.

7

www.lycoming.edu

T H E CO L L E G E