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Marla Kramer

Associate Director of

Advancement Communications

from the

I

It’s encouraging to

see that Lycoming

actually is different:

Seeing an opportunity

to bolster its

academic offerings

and visage, Lycoming

took it. And change is

afoot.

,,

Many say they are not afraid of change. But can they walk the

talk? When I joined the Lycoming team earlier this year, I quickly

learned about new programs that would help all students engage in

experiential learning, develop leadership skills and graduate with

what is truly a 21st-century education.

It’s encouraging to see that Lycoming actually is different:

Seeing an opportunity to bolster its academic offerings and visage,

Lycoming took it. And change is afoot.

For all those who were unable to attend the Campaign for a

Greater Lycoming launch during Homecoming weekend, this issue

will explain it all, and provide some examples along the way of how the campaign is already in

full swing. Chip Edmonds ’98, vice president for college advancement, has graciously authored

an article to provide context for the campaign, as well as the four priorities that will help the

College achieve its goals. Look for it on page 31.

From my office in Mary Lindsay Welch Honors Hall, I’ve witnessed first-hand during the past

few months, buildings coming down, clearing the way for new. Pat Marty, executive director of

communications and external relations, contributed the story on page 27, delivering background

on the proposed Gateway Project area as it pertains to Old City.

Rounding out this issue are stories about alumni doing exciting things with their educations,

as well as current students just beginning their journeys.

As you make your way through the magazine, look for various “stamps” on stories, each

demonstrating how the campaign’s priorities have already been set into motion. It will soon

become clear how the various components will come together to enable Lycoming to take its

place among the nation’s top liberal arts colleges.

n past lives, I worked with organizations that for whatever

reason — fear, complacency — were hesitant to modernize, even

if those changes promised results.

4

LYCOMING COLLEGE 2017 SPRING MAGAZINE

T H E CO L L E G E