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9

www.lycoming.edu

T H E CO L L E G E

A

2013 article

in The Guardian*

declared, “All artists

are entrepreneurs,”

adding, “This is not a

new or innovative way

of thinking.” While

the idea certainly isn’t

new, it hadn’t quite

made its way to college

art curriculums until

recently. Traditionally,

in undergraduate and

graduate programs

across the country,

students learn how to

draw, paint and sculpt,

how to discuss their art,

and even how to consider

it philosophically, but

not how to monetize

it. In other words, they

learn about art, but not

the business of art.

Dr. Bonita Kolb is looking to fill that gap in knowledge with

her new book, “Entrepreneurship for the Creative and Cultural

Industries,” which focuses on guiding creative individuals in

basic business concepts to empower them to be successful.

“All creative individuals, if they sell their artistic efforts, are

also business people,” Dr. Kolb said. “The more income they

can derive from their art, the less time and effort will need to go

into obtaining income from other sources.”

The push for student-artists to become more business-

minded is, according to Kolb, being encouraged by families as

well. Parents are concerned that their children in creative fields

will be unemployed and unable to afford their student loans.

Thus, Kolb’s new book includes advice from professional

artists who have transformed their ideas into a profitable

business. It also teaches students to understand the basics of

business language, to appreciate the crucial importance of

finance and to use social media for marketing, giving them the

tools they need to turn their art practice into a financially viable

venture.

“Entrepreneurship for the Creative and Cultural Industries”

will be published by Routledge in April of 2015.

*“Artist as entrepreneur: the American model or same old

American dream?” by Andrew Horwitz.

A

rtwork by Howard

Tran, associate professor

of art and department

chair, was included in

the “Almost Human”

exhibition at Converge

Gallery in Williamsport. The show was on display from Nov.

21 to Jan.31 and highlighted the efforts of local as well as

international artists who have shown everywhere from New

York City to Russia.

“I am very pleased to be exhibiting with this group of well-

respected, established artists,” Tran said. “It is a very strong

show with a common figurative element executed in a wide

range of aesthetic approaches.”

Tran’s work ranges from figurative to abstract sculpture.

Utilizing traditional and nontraditional materials, he creates

pieces that emphasize texture and symbols that reflect his

Vietnamese/Chinese background.

The exhibition itself, “Almost Human,” was arranged around

the following question: “What defines a human being as such

and which tools do we have to investigate the boundary between

being human and not being human?” It explored elements

that allowed not only ordinary viewers, but also scientists and

intellectuals in general to individuate and circumscribe the

main physical and conceptual features of a human being.

Art professor featured

IN PHILOSOPHICAL EXHIBITION AT

CONVERGE GALLERY

The business of art

DR. BONITA KOLB’S FIFTH BOOK AIMS

TO HELP ARTISTS BECOME PROFESSIONALS

All creative individuals,

if they sell their artistic

efforts, are also business

people.

I am very pleased to be

exhibiting with this group

of well-respected,

established artists.