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7

www.lycoming.edu

T H E CO L L E G E

oing abroad gives

anthropology students the

opportunity to conduct full

ethnographic research since they can

live in an environment long enough

to fully experience the local culture.

While study abroad has always been

a priority for Lycoming College, the

field has seen a major push within the

past year.

“We are giving students the

opportunity to go abroad and conduct

research at the undergraduate level,

which puts them ahead for graduate school,” said Dr. Ryan

Adams, assistant professor of anthropology.

Matthew Amendolara ’15 from Bristol, Rhode Island,

made a return visit to Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. During

his first trip there, he was intrigued by a mural that portrayed

images of the 30-year Guatemalan Civil War and genocide

that ended the 1990s. Seeing the image inspired him to

return to Guatemala to investigate the effects of globalization

and resistance theory on the street art that can be found

throughout the city of Quetzaltenango.

Amendolara spent his days learning Spanish, attending

speeches and galleries throughout town and, most

importantly, interacting with the local people to gain

perspective on their culture. While the Civil War is over,

it is still a sensitive topic within the culture and he quickly

discovered the heightened culture of fear that citizens are

currently living in.

“Learning about these ideas and seeing it are two totally

different things,” said Amendolara. “It ended up being

extremely rewarding because I taught myself that I could do

this on my own in a foreign land and come away with not only

an awesome experience, but also a really interesting research

project.”

Michelle Neifert ’15 from

Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania combined

her interests in archaeology and

anthropology when she traveled to

Trim, Ireland. She originally planned

the trip as an archaeological dig in

a medieval town, but later decided

that she would also investigate the

close working relationship that Trim

locals had developed with the local

archaeological site.

“The archaeological site is at the

heart of the town and the community

has really created an identity around promoting knowledge

and involvement with the site,” said Neifert. “Pubs are the main

place of interaction in Ireland, so I spent a lot of my free time

there just meeting new people and talking to them about the

community.”

Neifert was not the only student to combine her archaeology

and anthropology interests. Brigid Clark ’15 from Wyndmoor,

Pennsylvania spent her summer in Cyprus, an island that

is divided between Turkish and Greek heritage, where

many different citizens have been uprooted in the midst of

the conflict. With the relocation and identity shift that has

occurred, people have reconstructed their identities. Clark

focused on the archaeology site and its influence on the locals.

She spent her days observing how the locals interacted with

one another and the site itself. Although she faced several

language barriers, Clark studied the reactions that people had to

both the physical site and the finds from the site. “What I found

the most astounding was the trouble the locals had accepting

the non-Greek artifacts that were found at the site,” said Clark.

“These artifacts are also a part of their history, but if it didn’t

support their identity beliefs, it wasn’t important to them.”

Both Clark and Amendolara were invited to present their

research findings at the Society for Applied Anthropology

(SfAA) Conference in March.

R E S E A R C H A R O U N D T H E W O R L D

Students complete capstone project abroad

“We are giving students the

opportunity to go abroad and

conduct research

at the undergraduate level,

which puts them ahead

for graduate school”

G