2014 Lycoming Winter Magazine - page 27

earned run, a walk and seven hits. She
struck out three.
The win changed the Warriors’
fortunes, as they won their last four
games of the season to earn a spot in the
Commonwealth Conference Tournament
for the first time.
Football: Oct. 15, 2005
Lycoming 33, No. 8 Ithaca 30 (OT)
It was almost unheard of that the
Lycoming College football team was 1-4
at the midway point of the 2005 season.
Not just that, it had just suffered a 49-14
loss to FDU-Florham two weeks prior
when eighth-ranked Ithaca came to town
during week six.
Lycoming quarterback Glenn Smith
scored the winning touchdown on a
nine-yard scamper on the Warriors’ first
overtime possession after the defense
had forced Ithaca to settle for a field goal
during its overtime drive. 
Down 27-14 with 9:49 left,
the Warriors rallied with a pair of
touchdowns, as Smith scored on an
eight-yard rush and then with 2:13 left,
Jim Laky scored on a 19-yard run, but the
extra point failed, sending the game to
overtime.
Smith completed 24-of-32 passes
for 251 yards and a pair of scores. The
junior signal-caller was equally, if not
more dangerous, running the football.
Throughout the contest, Smith proved an
enigma for the Bombers with impressive
runs from a shotgun formation. For the
game, he ran 17 times for 67 yards and
two touchdowns.
Football: Dec. 6, 1997
Lycoming 28, Rowan 20 – national
semifinals
Playing against a team that had
reached the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
in three of the previous four seasons, the
Lycoming College football team pulled
off one of the biggest upsets in school
history.
Down 20-0 at halftime, the Warriors
embarked on the road to one of the
greatest comebacks in school history,
scoring two third-quarter touchdowns to
cut the Profs’ lead to six points. In the
fourth quarter, junior quarterback Jason
Marraccini capped a 14-play, 80-yard
drive with a five-yard touchdown run.
After Lycoming got the ball back thanks
to a Rowan miscue on the kickoff, junior
Brian Thompson hit paydirt, ensuring
the 28-20 win to send the Warriors to the
NCAA Division III Championship for the
second time.
Wrestling: Jan. 11, 1997
No. 10 Lycoming 24, No. 4
John Carroll 18 – Budd Whitehill Duals
Championship
In a tournament with 15 of the top 25
teams in Division III, it was Lycoming
College, who entered the tournament
ranked 18
th
, that took the crown and leapt
15 spots in the national rankings thanks
to the school’s first Budd Whitehill
National Duals Championship.
Jerry Boland and Aaron Fitt each
recorded pins to help the Warriors out
to an 18-6 lead after five matches in the
finals against fourth-seed John Carroll,
which was brimming with confidence
after posting a win over three-time
defending champion The College of New
Jersey in the semifinals. Andy Lausier
and Matt Yonkin each notched decisions,
with Yonkin’s win at 190 pounds sealing
the win.
The Warriors finished the season
with a 22-0 dual meet record and
third in the NWCA poll, behind only
longtime wrestling powers Augsburg and
Wartburg.
Football: Dec. 1, 1990
Lycoming 20, Hofstra 10 – national
semifinals
On the road for the second straight
week in the 1990 NCAA Division III
playoffs, the Warriors headed for the
artificial turf at Hofstra University,
looking to reach the Stagg Bowl for the
first time against a team that had reached
the NCAA playoffs in each of the last
five years.
The Warriors faced challenges before
they even got to New York for the
game, as the Flying Dutchmen played
on an artificial turf field. Head coach
Frank Girardi made a call to Penn State
and the Nittany Lion football program
donated their turf shoes to the Warriors
for the game. Wearing the Lions’ shoes,
First Team All-MAC defensive end Joe
Emrick notched three sacks and MAC
Player of the Year Ed Dougherty tossed
for two touchdowns and 220 yards in the
20-10 win over the Flying Dutchmen,
who began a reclassification process to
take them to Division I the next year.
Football: Sept. 26, 1970
Lycoming 21, Wilkes 16
After a season-opening 7-0 loss to
Albright, the Warriors, led by fourth-year
head coach Budd Whitehill, headed to
Wilkes on a hot September day in 1970
looking to end Wilkes’ 31-game MAC
winning streak.
In the first half of the game, Wilkes
took a 10-0 lead, but the Warriors fought
back, with quarterback Gunther Nellen
hitting receiver Nick Tabolinski for an
11-yard touchdown pass. After another
Wilkes touchdown made it 16-7, the
Warriors got an interception and Tom
Hinkle wrapped up a 35-yard drive with
a score. Vince Joy gave the Warriors
the lead when he notched a 43-yard
interception return for a touchdown to
make it 21-16.
In the second half, the defenses took
over and the Warriors allowed just a field
goal to provide the final two-point margin
of victory. Hinkle led the Warriors with
49 yards on the ground, helping lift the
team to one of the largest upsets in the
school’s collegiate era. 
Amazingly, it was Wilkes’ first loss at
Ralston Field, which opened in 1965, a
span of 19 games before the Warrior win. 
Football: Oct. 13, 1956
Lycoming 13, Juniata 6
Just two years after reinstating the
football program, the Warriors produced
three wins. It was in the third year, 1956,
that the team began to truly believe in
itself and the system under head coach
David Busey. With Methodist All-
Americans Ken Polcyn and Red White
leading the charge, the Warriors pulled
off one of the greatest upsets in the
history of the school.
Juniata came to College Field with
a 25-game unbeaten streak, the longest
streak in the nation besides Oklahoma’s,
and the Warriors came away with a 13-6
win.
Early in the game, Athletics Hall of
Famer John Joe gave the Warriors some
momentum, scoring on a 10-yard run.
However, the Indians tied the game
before halftime with a long run. Both
teams fought through the third quarter
and then the Warriors struck again, as
Frank Agnello found John Grier for a 25-
yard score in the fourth quarter and the
Warriors hung on from there.
Classes were suspended on the
Monday after the game and the whole
school celebrated the historic win.
27
I...,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26 28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,...46
Powered by FlippingBook